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Shock Study: Link Between Deer Antlers And Osteoporosis Discovered

deer-antlers-osteoporosis

Today, I will let you in on an unusual chain of events that led researchers to discover that after all, there is another mineral besides calcium that plays a crucial role in osteoporosis. And that nutrition matters. I call it an out-of-laboratory experience…

Here’s what happened. The winter of 2005 turned out to be unusually cold in Spain. And on that same year, scientists at the Research Institute of Hunting Resources (IREC) noticed that deers’ antlers were breaking at an alarming rate. Nobody could figure out the reason for this strange occurrence.

Fast forward to January of this year, when the study that solved the mystery was published in the Frontiers of Bioscience journal.1 Conducted by a team of researchers from the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) and IREC, their findings and conclusion will most likely rattle the mainstream medical establishment.

Manganese and a “New” Look at Osteoporosis

The scientists concluded that the fragility and subsequent breakage of the deer’s antlers were linked to low levels of the trace mineral manganese. The trigger was the cold weather, which caused plants and shrubs that deer normally eat to produce a lot less manganese, effectively changing the deer’s diet.

The researchers further postulate that osteoporosis can therefore not be directly linked to just a lack of calcium – something that I’ve been saying for years. But rather, that calcium cannot be efficiently absorbed without the presence of other crucial micronutrients such as manganese.

Tomás Landete, one of the lead study researchers explains that, “Antlers grow by transferring 20% of the skeleton’s calcium towards their structure. We therefore saw that it was not calcium deficiency that caused the weakening but rather the deficiency of manganese.”2 What’s more, Tomás and team are finally flirting with the up-to-now ignored truth that calcium loss is a consequence and not the origin of osteoporosis.

With this new evidence from none other than deers’s antlers, mainstream scientists can no longer keep their blinders on. Sooner – rather than later – they will have to acknowledge that there’s more to osteoporosis than bone demineralization that just happens at a certain point in life. And that even though calcium is the most prominent mineral in bones, it doesn’t mean that adding more calcium supplementation and prescribing dangerous drugs will solve the osteoporosis epidemic.

It’s About Bone Health Harmony

If you have the Save Our Bones Program, you already know that manganese is a Foundation Supplement because it is essential for connective tissue and protein synthesis. You are also aware of its important role in other aspects of health, including the production of thyroxine, the main thyroid hormone.

And fruits and veggies like artichokes, spinach, and pineapples are just a few of the delicious Foundation Foods listed in the Save Our Bones Program that contain manganese.

But the Save Our Bones Program does more. It clearly tells you which are the most important nutrients that nourish and strengthen your bones when present in the body at the same time and in the right proportion and dosage.

Nourishing your bones with only one or two nutrients is like an orchestra where only one or two instruments play. Such an orchestra will never match the majestic sound of many instruments playing in perfect tune and rhythm with each other.

So stay “in tune” with your bone health by doing what’s right for your bones and for your overall health.

Till next time,

References

1 Tomas Landete-Castillejos. Alternative hypothesis for the origin of osteoporosis: The role of Mn. Frontiers in Bioscience, 2012; E4 (1): 1385.
2 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120103134915.htm

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39 comments. Leave Yours Now →

  1. Freddie October 19, 2012, 1:43 pm

    Hi Vivian,
    Thanks so much for all your research for those of us battling osteopenia and osteoporosis. Recently, my doctor recommended 40mg of Omeprazole once a day. Naturally, I told him I didn’t want to take it. Do you know if there is an alternative that is healthy for my bones. Thanks

  2. juvy April 12, 2012, 12:47 pm

    Thank you very much Vivian, you are very kind to share all the health information.

    I wish you all the good health in the world.God Bless,bye for now.

    My kind regards to you and to your family too.

    juvy

  3. Joyce E Hall March 29, 2012, 6:26 am

    I have completely changed my diet. No fabulous weight loss but that matters not at this point. I am very happy with the continued information I receive from Vivian. I take it all seriously. I had an increase in my bone density just about eight months into the program. I started the program last year after having been diagnoesed with Osteoporosis. This passed year I improved my bone density simply by daily suggestions from Vivian. “Diet wise” eating a huge dinner of Calcium rich Veggies. I am happy to eat a plate of brocoli, mushrooms, onions, tomatoe, and any other veggie I can find to add to my stir fry. This program has changed my minus to a plus on the bones scale. I wll continue this diet forever because it tastes so good to have healthy bones. My doctor was amazed and surprised with the Dexa Scan results. He said ” I wont perscribe anything, obviously you know what you need to do to be bone healthy”….. Thanks Vivian

  4. Leonard Green March 15, 2012, 10:31 pm

    Some food like Kale, asparagus and other contain thousands % of vit K?
    But there is limit. How about it?
    leonard

  5. Rose March 9, 2012, 3:57 pm

    Hi Vivian, I am on your program. I try to take calcium and vits d and k in calcium chew. But, it makes my sick to my stomack, so much gas and discomfort. I want away for a week and did not take calcium at all because it’s truly embarring. How much manganese do I need to take?

    Thanking you in advance. Love Rose

  6. Rose March 9, 2012, 3:33 pm

    Hi Vivian, I have your program and am doing my best. How much maganese should one take. Thank you, Rose

  7. Isobel March 2, 2012, 1:52 am

    I just received Densercise, and I really like it and find that it really matches my philosophy of leading and active life. My only problem is my computer room is very small and it is very warm at this time of the year (more correctly most of the year up here in Far North Queensland). So I have been trying to download the video onto a DVD so I can use it in the TV on our verandah (where we do most of our living). Is there anyway I can do this.
    As an aside, my bone density has increased by 2.5% 12 months after stopping taking Actonel, all I have been taking in Algecal.
    Regards
    Isy Mc Donald

  8. sally jo February 24, 2012, 3:20 pm

    I am researching osteoporosis and how to repair the bone damage it has already caused. I am asking for any help or guidance that can be given to further my research. Note: I am 48. I have severe osteoporosis compounded by a lifetime of hyperthyroidism. My density rating is currently at -4.0 with overall score of -3.7. I have not even reached the menopause era yet. If you are familiar with the impact of thyroid disease to the progression of osteoporosis as well as confusion of trying to supplement the diet when the thyroid causes the supplements to be used the wrong way by the body, I would really like to talk to you.
    Note: I do eat healthy and excercise regularly. also live active lifestyle. I also take vitamins and supplements on a daily basis. even blood work shows I have good calcium levels and health overall. So why do i have lumbar compound fractures, excessive femur fractures (most unknown at time of occurence) and continuing progression of the osteoporosis.
    It’s overwhelming.
    Note: I cannot digest dairy products so i have spent my life finding other good sources of calcium and trace minerals. There is something missing somewhere.

    • Carlson April 19, 2012, 1:48 pm

      Do you exercise regularly? Have you tried weight lifting? And I mean actual strength training. There are a lot of studies showing a direct correlation with bone density.

      Increase the amount of water you’re drinking, add more protein, and take add a time released calcium supplement.

  9. Debbie Moore February 23, 2012, 6:33 pm

    I have just had a bone densitometry & mentioned to my Doctor that I wasn’t interested in taking any drugs, if the news was bad. My scores were no worse than in 2009, in fact one had slightly improved…thanks to your progam! I was surprised that my Doctor wouldn’t prescribe the drugs anyway & in fact, told me to get all my calcium from food..not calcium supplements. She said new studies show that there is a risk of heart disease in people taking ordinary calcium supplements.I told her about the Save Our Bones program & she said she hadn’t heard of it but it could only be useful in anyone’s health. Debbie, Australia

  10. june February 17, 2012, 1:07 am

    we have your program. we did not get the shopping or supplement lists how do we find these?

  11. dr scott einhorn February 16, 2012, 11:21 pm

    For crying out loud alreday. Talking about bones and calcium is akin to suscribing the piltdown man debacle. Bone, like all other body tissues, are living tissues. As such, ALL nutrients are required for proper bone develoment.
    Bone is 1/3 minerals, 1/3 water and 1/3 protein. In seniors, due to a combination of dietary protein deficit often due to lack of appetite in turn often often linked to lack of taste oft due to zinc deficiency, creating a lack of desire to eat. Combine that with such pronounced activity lack and caloric expenditure, that there is little reason for hunger to develop (aside from the need for nutrition, but now we come full circle back to interest lack).
    Finally, we have the extremly commom phenom. of hypochlorhydria, thus rendering any consumed protein, wholly or partially undigested. And thus, well, you can see where this goes.
    Then there is the either functional or sub-acute pathologic dehydration.
    Minerals required, well, all. Worry about specifics is putting the cart before the horse, unless one is referring to why deer antlers are prematurely disengaging from their owners heads!
    Bone mineral integrity requires: Ca, Mg, Mn, Cu, Bo, Si, Fl, Vit A, spleen activity…and the list goes on and on.
    We are not even talking about bone building hormones, and the effects of Wolffe’s Law (the piezo-electric effect of bone strengthening).
    So I know of course that I am coming across as Mr full of myself, but the facts are what they are.
    Bone health is not that complicated. Eat real foods, eat them slowly and well, and exercise – every day of your whole life, to whatever degree works for you.
    end of sermon

    • Lynda February 18, 2012, 10:29 am

      Hi Scot,
      I think you have overeacted a little. If you look at Vivian’s website you will see it is all about learning which foods contain the best source of nutrients (some of which you mention) for maintaining bone integrety. It is also about the importance of maintaining a good pH balance, something which is deemed important for overal bodily function. It also looks at the use of the best supplements (as opposed to pharmecuticals which for many come with unwanted side effects)drawing our attention to the part vit K and D have to play for example.Supplemts could perhaps be considered for someone with lack of appetite due to lack of taste due to lack of zinc which you mention. To my mind the article on deer was interesting and a reminder that manganese figures in the list of nutrients which contribute to bone integrity. (It is the medical profession that has placed emphasis on calcium.)
      Exercise is also suggested, exercise suited to osteoporosis sufferers, which covers the piezo electric affect.
      Not all osteoporosis suffers are seniors, some of us are in our forties and have found Vivian’s website hugely supportive.

  12. Joan Forman February 16, 2012, 11:18 pm

    Always seeking information that will help me to improve and maintain my health, including the health of my bones. I am borderline osteopenia.

  13. ita February 16, 2012, 8:26 pm

    Thank you, Ita.

  14. Shula February 16, 2012, 5:36 pm

    Thank you for updating us on this. Amazing. shula.

  15. yasin February 16, 2012, 4:37 pm

    Hi Vivien
    Thank you for your up to date follow up

    Iam grateful

    yasin

  16. Coral Vorster February 16, 2012, 3:51 pm

    Dr Jonathan Wright at his Tahoma Clinic Nutrition & Healing states that people he has worked with have experienced between 3 and 11% improvement in bone density in 1 year by using calcium, strontium carbonate, vitamin D and Vit K2 which takes the calcium and puts it back into the bones.
    Taking strontium in addition to calcium is more effective that calcium alone. Numerous studies have demonstrated that strontium does MUCH MORE THAN SLOW THE DETERIORATION OF YOUR BONES – it actually stimulates rapid bone formation.Double blind, placebo study published in New England Journal of Medicine showed a combination of strontium carbonate, calcium & Vit D2 increased bone density by 9 – 15% over 3 years.Also 90% of people tested with osteoporosis have low stomach acid and your body won’t be able to absorb calcium,strontium and other minerals nearly as well so results won’t be good.

    • Linda T February 16, 2012, 6:23 pm

      My research on strontium includes:
      Do not take within 4-6 hours of taking calcium. They fight each other for absorbtion. I take mine with a sip of water in the middle of the night when I get up to use the bathroom.

      Be aware that strontium will affect your bone mineral density test and skew the results. Make sure the place you’re going for the test knows how to modify the BMD score because of the strontium.

  17. Gerri D. February 16, 2012, 2:57 pm

    You would be surprised how many people do not know the dangers of the medications the Dr.s are prescribing for Osteoporosis.
    I always refer them to your website. Thanks again for all the info that you make available to us.
    Gerri D.

  18. Elizabeth Kramer February 16, 2012, 2:30 pm

    I have bought your book and also read your e mails about Osterporosis and now the article about Manganese. What about Strontium ? Another Doctor I know recomments this as being the missing link in our armour against bone weakening. I have never heard you say anything about Strontium. Please comment. Elizabeth Kramer

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 16, 2012, 8:20 pm

      Hi Dorothy and Elizabeth – Please read Strontium Demystified to get my take on strontium.

  19. Dorothy B. Cooper February 16, 2012, 2:25 pm

    This is very interesting, as all of your articles are. I have been hearing a lot about Strontium for your bones. I would like to know your opinion concerning this.

    Thank you

  20. Jennifer February 16, 2012, 2:09 pm

    I’ve known about how important manganese and magnesium taken together are for people battling arthritis since I was a teenager in the early 70s when I came across an article in a doctors magazine. I took them together for a number of years and reduced all pain for at least a decade. My question is what can I do for the deer who roam my property in Alaska? I have often wondered if the lichen growing on limestone have special nutritional benefits for the deer as opposed to the mosses on trees? I always understood manganese worked for people in concert with magnesium and calcium and vitamin D.

    • Jaka October 5, 2012, 1:04 am

      Can I share something about zucnhici? We had a bumper crop of zucnhici due to the fact that every seed I planted came up and I couldn’t destroy the plants. We ate our fill, shredded and froze quite a bit, but still had about 10 left. My house is kept quite cool all winter-56 degrees-and those squash have lived in a corner of my kitchen happily since last fall.I keep checking them, and there have been no soft spots. A few have begun to change color to a yellowish, but the flavor has remained fine(I thought they’d be bitter). It’s now May 1 and I’m dreaming of my garden for this year, if the rain ever stops. You can be sure we’ll do the zucnhici plants again just maybe not so many!

  21. Virginia Hudson February 16, 2012, 12:47 pm

    What an interesting article! Besides a mild form of lupus, I also have fibromyalgia. A Nature’s Pantry article described several things to treat fibro, including manganese. I tried it, Manganese Asporotate, with excellent results. I have previously had problems with feeling cold to the bone, especially in winter with Missouri’s rugged continental climate. After starting manganese along with TriIodine, I do not react as violently to cold as before. I am continuing use of manganese. By the way, posture-wise I am 64 and straight as an arrow.

  22. Alma February 16, 2012, 12:23 pm

    Keep up the good work.This info.should be passed on to all physician’s.Our society is being poisioned with too many med’s.I’ve increased my magnesium intake and it has improved my regularity.What’s the main difference-manganese vs magnesium? Thanking you in advance.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 16, 2012, 8:28 pm

      Hi Alma – Magnesium and manganese are two separate minerals, but both are Foundation Supplements that are important to your bone health. I describe all of the Foundation Supplements in detail in the Save Our Bones Program.

  23. Louise Stewart February 16, 2012, 10:48 am

    Hi Vivian;

    I have your program and am pleased to have all your help. I’m 73 and

    feel much younger and take no meds.

    In Canada, we have the magazine MORE for women over 40. In its Sept.2011

    issue there is an article “Could bone drugs be breaking your bones?”

    written by a woman whose femur or thigh bone fractured after taking Foxamax

    for 10 years. It is very interesting and I will mail it to you when I

    return from a little trip with my hubby and some daughters. Thanks again.

    Louise

  24. Louis February 16, 2012, 9:50 am

    The cold weather would also further deplete the deer’s thyroid hormone reserve. Reduced Manganese + Reduced Thyroid hormone available may lead to reduced Parathyroid production, hence lower Calcitonin levels.

    Did the study check for lower Calcitonin levels in the cold-weather Deer population?

  25. Dortha February 16, 2012, 8:38 am

    WOW..I am constantly amazed with this new information!! Thanks so much for staying on the forefront of what is actually going on. Where would we be without your latest studies and your willingness to keep us informed!! Thanks for all you do!

  26. Lynda February 16, 2012, 8:15 am

    What an interesting peice of research Vivian … which got me looking at the foods which contain manganese … again! … and thinking … heve I been neglecting that ? … am I getting enough?
    Perhaps I’m lazy but I could do with a simple recipe book containing daily menus which, over a week say, include all the bone enriching nutients in the right proportions. I know you do offer recipes from time to time but its getting the overal balance that confuses me.

    • Marsha February 16, 2012, 11:18 am

      Vivian,
      I too would like a menu for a weeks time or even a month for a well balance of all the bone building foods & portions. That is one of my biggest down fall.
      Thats for all your great info. that you keep telling us about.

  27. LESLIE February 16, 2012, 6:47 am

    Hi! Vivian,

    Another VERY GOOD AND INFORMATIVE ARTICLE! THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR ALL YOUR RESEARCH!

    LOVE, MS. L. (LESLIE)

  28. Annabelle February 16, 2012, 6:18 am

    Thank you Vivian for reinforcing the fact that manganese is an important mineral along with the others mentioned in “Save our Bones”. It is so helpful to be reminded although the good calcium supplements include all the important minerals including manganese. Your timely news is much appreciated. Thank you, Annabelle

  29. Julie February 16, 2012, 5:47 am

    Vivian, thanks for the new research about manganese as the solution to avoiding osteoporosis. Does this mean that there is no need to take
    calcium if we take manganese? Hopefully, it is a better supplement to
    take than calcium. Right now, what is strengthening my bones is the re-
    gular physical fitness program although I still take calcium.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 16, 2012, 9:32 pm

      Hi Julie and Priscilla – No, taking manganese does not mean you don’t need calcium. As I write in this article and in The Save Our Bones Program, bone health is not about one or two nutrients; all of the Foundation Supplements, which I discuss in detail in the Program, work in synergy and are important for bone health.

    • Priscilla Morris February 16, 2012, 6:21 am

      I did stop taking calcium and I exercise by walking and riding a bike each day. Do I need to be taking manganese?

  30. elsie February 16, 2012, 5:31 am

    Thank you Vivien for all your research and caring communications on facts relating to osteoporosis .I really appreciate advice given and it takes away from any guilty feelings I have about not taking the Fosomax that was prescribed by my medical practice.I take care about diet and a daily supplement of ‘Osteocare’. Thank you .

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