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How To Prevent Cataracts While Building Your Bones

cataracts-bone-health

I recently noticed that I was not seeing well with my current eyeglasses, especially with my right eye. So last week I went for a checkup with an ophthalmologist.

What happened during that office visit shook me to the core. It also strongly confirms how important it is for health practitioners to openly share the knowledge so that everyone, without exception, can take control of their health.

And as a result of this experience, I found a study that I’m sure will amaze you. Incredibly, it ties in eye health with bone loss.

I can’t wait to share my story with you today, so let’s get started!

My Appointment With The Eye Doctor

As it turned out, the eye exam revealed that my my glasses were actually too corrective, since the new lenses were less strong both for distance and for reading. I was elated! After years of getting stronger prescriptions each time, this was most certainly a welcome change for the better.

But when I asked for confirmation from the doctor that my eyesight had improved, all she said was that my eyesight had “changed.” Knowing that the new correction I needed was far less strong than my previous one, I insisted and asked her why couldn’t she say that my eyesight had in effect improved.

She replied that the early stages of cataracts could cause this sort of change. So I requested that she check my eyes for cataracts, and the test came out negative (more on cataract and an amazing study that links cataract prevention and bone loss later.)

I asked her again if now, knowing what she knew, she could confirm that my eyesight had improved. She simply replied, “I don’t have time for a lecture.”

Her answer stunned me, and soon enough I realized that…

What Happened To Me Corroborates A Sad Truth About The Medical Establishment

Many doctors don’t like to share information with their patients (even if it’s good news, as in my case!). There are a couple of reasons for this: knowledge is power, and doctors may feel uneasy if they empower their patients. Why? Simply because once patients obtain knowledge, they are much less likely to rely on the doctor for their health decisions.

Secondly, keeping patients in the realm of the unknown gives doctors a manipulative edge… by keeping the patient on edge.

The issue of doctors not communicating well with their patients has been addressed in various reports and articles over the years. In fact, a movement is afoot to train doctors to improve their bedside manners, because poor doctor-patient communication is not just unsettling for patients. It can actually drive up health care costs and negatively affect the quality of care patients receive.

I’m Not Demonizing Doctors

Please don’t misunderstand what I am saying here. I want to emphasize that not all doctors subscribe to this approach. I know there are many wonderful physicians who have no issues whatsoever sharing knowledge with their patients.

Sometimes, it’s a simple matter of the doctor not having enough time, and often times, they may not even realize how insensitive they’re acting towards their patients. But remember, I am not calling out individual doctors, nor am I making a blanket statement that all doctors are like this. Rather, I am pointing out that this sadly happens all too often as evidenced by my lifelong experience with doctors as well as reports from friends, family, and fellow ‘Savers’.

The Save Our Bones Program Empowers You To Take Control Of Your Bone Health

In sharp contrast, the Save Our Bones Program approach is completely different from that of the Medical Establishment. My goal is to empower each person to reverse (or prevent) bone loss and increase bone density naturally. Armed with the correct knowledge, you can choose your own path to health.

In fact, the Program offers step-by-step guidance to show you exactly how to apply the principles described in the book, so you can copy exactly what I and thousands of Save Our Bones community members have done to take control of their bone health and increase bone density.

To eliminate any guesswork, the Save Our Bones Program has recently undergone a slight “makeover.” It now offers even more supplemental material that clarifies and actuates the “Saver” approach, and makes the difference between having the Program and actually using it.

First, there is the Save Our Bones Program Calendar, included inside the book, that breaks up the material into a 3-week time period. The Calendar provides day-to-day instructions so you know exactly what to do and when. This eliminates any “now what do I do?” anxiety, and allows you to relax and focus on building your bones.

Second, the Save Our Bones Program includes a Recipe Sampler, so you get a hands-on way to be proactive about your bone health.

In addition, Bone Appétit, the separate companion cookbook, showcases a delicious collection of pH-balanced bone-building dishes, many of which include Foundation Foods.

There’s no need to wonder “what do I do next?” with all the helpful materials available. You can take charge and change the course of your bone health without any guesswork.

And now back to cataracts and the study I mentioned earlier…

Scientifically Proven! You Can Prevent Cataracts While Building Your Bones

When my eye doctor mentioned the possibility of cataracts changing my eyesight, I began to research this condition and how it might be prevented or even reversed naturally. And I discovered a fascinating study. It concludes that “Moderate (walking) and vigorous (running) exercise were both significantly associated with lower cataract risk.”1

The study adjusted for gender, diet, lifestyles, and other variables, and the risk of developing cataracts was significantly lowered for both men and women who walked or ran regularly. And, as “Savers” know, walking and running are weight-bearing activities that increase bone density. In fact, both are mentioned in the Save Our Bones Program as excellent bone-building suggestions.

This ties in nicely with the Save Our Bones philosophy, and underscores a fundamental concept: when you give your body what it needs, it will respond with optimal health.

Maybe the eye doctor did not “have time for a lecture.” But we can all make time to learn and apply the concepts of scientifically-backed natural health solutions.

Till next time,

References

1 Williams, P.T. “Walking and running are associated with similar reductions in cataract risk.” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 June; 45(6): 1089-96. Web. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23274600

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41 comments. Leave Yours Now →

  1. R G Elmendorf February 27, 2014, 12:35 pm

    You tell ‘em, Vivian. If I ever finish my “Ninety-Nine Rules of Modern Medical Practice” article (about 2015 at the rate I am going), I’ll send you a copy. Rule #1 is
    “Keep the patient waiting” Rule #2 is “Keep the patient in the dark”. Rule #3 is “Keep the patient drugged”. Rule #4 is………….. well, you get the idea, I’m sure. RGE

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 27, 2014, 2:09 pm

      Your list is all-too-true, RG!

  2. Lois Bateson February 27, 2014, 11:41 am

    Dear Vivian, I submitted a question to you on 2/24/14 re: alternative thoughts for RX of Glaucomo, now having had the drops and laser surgery recommended. As mentioned in that note to you, my ophthalmologist is not satisfied with the post 0p eye pressure and may want to do more surgery. I am reluctant to go further in that direction if there is any alternative way I can aid and abet this problem.
    I do value your take on this question. Thank you. Lois

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 27, 2014, 2:08 pm

      Dear Lois,
      I am sorry, but my area of expertise is bone health. :) I have not researched eye health in-depth, but I hope your eyesight improves and you’re able to come to an acceptable solution with your doctor!

  3. shula February 26, 2014, 7:58 pm

    Eyes and bones – interesting comparison, but from my experience – no relation between the two.

  4. Florence Brandwein February 25, 2014, 6:22 pm

    Dear Vivian,
    I have occassionally found a doctor, usually a specialist I am seeing for the first time, who does not wish to share too much information with a patient. That is a doctor I never see again. I insist on knowing all there is to know about my condition at the moment. I do a great deal of my own research and, thanks to you, I know quite a bit about a lot of things.
    I was diagnosed with cataracts about five years ago. One needed to be removed at once and I agreed; it was like looking through cheesecloth. It was done and it was the easiest surgery I’d ever had. When the second one got to a point that was troublesome it was done with the same results as before; 20/20 on both eyes. I cannot imagine anyone being afraid of having cataracts removed. Please, make certain you see a well-qualified surgeon and have it done. It’s a cinch, and you’ll never regret doing it. Incidentally, I am 87 years old and seeing better than I did years ago. My husband at 89 recently had both eyes done two weeks apart. He sailed through with flying colors.

    Thank you for all you do to keep us informed.

    Sincerely,

    FB in Arizona

  5. Irene Yen February 24, 2014, 9:34 pm

    Thanks very much for your articles which are so encouraging. At least now we will know how to handle bone loss or cataracts through your channel. Thanks for the heads up and may God bless you for blessing the osteoporosis community.

  6. Lois Bateson February 24, 2014, 8:25 pm

    Vivian, What do we know about glaucoma, other than drops and laser surgery, all of which my medics have prescribed and treated this past year. I have asked around the alternative circuits but no one seems to have a helpful hint on how to aid and abet nature with this problem. Please, look through your very savvy book of tricks for a less invasive way to go on this. My doc, after administering all the drops and doing laser in each eye, is not satisfied with the drop in eye pressure (12 at last testing) and thinks another more invasive surgery might be necessary. I am not eager to go that route. Help, help Lois

  7. Pip February 24, 2014, 7:23 pm

    Vivian, there is no citation in research that milk leaches calcium from the bones, as you claim. Absorption of calcium is strictly regulated by the body. This is different from the macro-nutrients of fat, sugar and proteins which are absorbed in as high amounts as possible. Calcium concentrations in the blood are controlled by 2 hormones, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin, as well as vitamin D.
    You should do thorough research as you are misleading the public.
    I’m sure you won’t publish this comment.
    Pip

  8. wilma greene February 24, 2014, 7:20 pm

    I have osteoporosis am 81 yrs. old, had annual eye exam last Oct. eyesight is better, I keep previous reports & compare. Dr.says I have the very small beginning of cataracts. Have heard too many war stories about surgeries, won’t let them touch my eyes, UNLESS I AM GOING BLIND!!!

  9. Linda February 24, 2014, 5:53 pm

    Vivian,

    I started wearing (distance) glasses in 4th grade. My eyesight continued to get worse until age 64. They improved! My ophthalmologist was amazed. After a few years, they reversed back and got worse again. I did begin having cataracts. I have power walked for many years, but the cataracts came anyway. I just had cataract surgery for both eyes. I’m seeing much better now.

  10. Angela February 24, 2014, 2:49 pm

    I also have both osteoporosis and cataracts. I have such a distrust of doctors that I made an appointment for cataract surgery, then cancelled. My doctor is affiliated with one of the best hospitals in the area, but I feel nervous about the procedure. This revolution between doctor and patient has occurred for a reason. It’s all good. We should question and be able to make informed decisions. Thanks Vivian.

    • Linda February 24, 2014, 5:56 pm

      Get the cataract surgery. You’ll be amazed how colors now look without the yellow/brown tint of the cataract. It was a simple procedure. Just make sure you are aware of the many options for cataract lenses–monovision, multi-focal lenses, lenses for astigmatism, and regular lenses.

    • Benilda Giasi February 24, 2014, 3:44 pm

      Angela, I just recently had cataract surgery–right eye in November; left eye in December. It was the best decision I made. I don’t need glasses, although I do have a prescription pair that I got at the ophthalmologist’s office to help me with the very fine print. So don’t be afraid; just make sure you have a good ophthalmologist. And once it’s all done, you’ll wonder why you didn’t do it sooner. If you have questions about it, you can e-mail me.
      Good luck!

  11. Jsdr February 24, 2014, 1:42 pm

    What are PH Buffers. Do you recommend
    Them, if not why?

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 3:17 pm

      Actually, the body has its own buffer system that works quite well, especially if it is not over-taxed with highly acid-forming foods. :) I think it’s better to boost the body’s own buffering abilities with a pH-balanced diet.

  12. Leslie (Ms. L. Carmel) February 24, 2014, 1:11 pm

    Hi! Vivian,

    I Know What You Mean When You Say A Doctor Doesn’t Like To Share Information With You.

    I Asked My Doctor About The Holistic, Or Another Alternative To Prescription Medicine, And He Clamed Up On Me. But I Keep Trying To Get Away From All My Prescription Medications. I Think I’ve Told You That I Have Replaced Some Of Them Already.

    Thank You For All You Do To Help Us SAVE OUR BONES!

    Take Care, And Stay Well.

    LOVE, LESLIE (MS. L. CARMEL)

  13. Mary A. February 24, 2014, 12:53 pm

    This is a question on the 17 Healthy Snacks booklet I just read. This may sound pretty basic but do you freeze these bananas for the recipes with the skins on or off??? Also the recipes with the drizzle Chocolate what kind of chocolate, cooking chocolate, hershey’s chocolate, hershey’s kisses, or chocolate chips????? I also have the cook book and haven’t got into that yet. Hope you can take the time to answer my questions. Mary A.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 3:44 pm

      Mary, I recommend dark chocolate (generally speaking, that means chocolate that is at least 60% cocoa). And yes, I recommend peeling bananas before freezing them. :)

  14. Sherrine February 24, 2014, 11:26 am

    We do have to be our own advocates when it comes to our health and we do need doctors that will work with us. After all, they are working for US! We hire them to help us take care of our health. If they don’t work with us or are rude, we should “fire” them. Vivian, I do hope you are looking for another opthalmologist. I know I would.

    My vision has improved, also, and I’m wondering if perhaps it’s because we are keeping our bodies more alkaline. I only need my glasses to drive now. I do have the start of cataracts but my opthalmologist told me about that and shares with me if they are getting worse (which they are not) with each appointment. As you said, there are wonderful doctors out there and I have many illnesses and ALL of my doctors are wonderful…now. I did leave a couple of practices to find the good ones.

    Sherrine

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 2:06 pm

      Yes, there are good doctors out there… and I’m glad you’re happy with yours!

      • Jennifer Whatson February 24, 2014, 4:48 pm

        Hi am a little bit more than disappointed that I as yet have not received your book which I’ve paid for in mid January . So far tracking advises that it is transistor that was a month ago! Not impressed!
        Jennifer Whatson Sydney Australia

        • Customer Support February 24, 2014, 5:51 pm

          Hi Jennifer,
          I don’t know why the postal service has not delivered your book! Please check your e-mail for correspondence from our Customer Support.

  15. abimanu February 24, 2014, 10:55 am

    In my comment, I forgot to mention that my doctor in Kissimmee, Florida is so nice and very thorough in his examination that he gave me some blue pills commonly known as Viagra when I went for my check-up. but I did not use it as I was scared because I was then 75. Please juxtapose yours and mine and the difference pales in comparison.
    Regards
    Abimanu

  16. Janice February 24, 2014, 10:41 am

    Around age 40 your vision may change as that is when many people become more far-sighted and begin to need glasses to read. At that time my near-sightedness got better. I thought my vision had improved but it was really just a ‘change’ according to the opthalamologist. I too have osteoporisis and now cataracts especially in my left eye. I didn’t know they were related. I am 67.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 2:05 pm

      Another vision “change”… fortunately for the better… Go figure! Thanks for sharing your story with us, Janice!

  17. abimanu February 24, 2014, 10:41 am

    Hi Vivian, First I was sorry that your doctor was rather rude to tell you that she had no time for a lecture.
    As for your advice to rid cataract, I am most grateful as usual for sharing your wise experience ,unlike the doctor, which I wish would improve my eyesight, though it is perfect with glasses for reading only.
    Grateful Abimanu

  18. Rebecca Sussman February 24, 2014, 10:24 am

    I take “Eyes Alive Vision Nutrition” supplement which contains Bilberry extract and Lutein which I feel help in keeping the eyes strong. A friend of my was also having trouble with her eyes and saw a strong improvement with taking Lutein.

    I do a lot of walking too and follow your Save Our Bones.

  19. Terry February 24, 2014, 10:07 am

    Very encouraging report Vivian!! It does make me wonder if I’m going through the same thing. Thanks for the heads up and thank you for going the “extra mile” for us.

  20. Helena February 24, 2014, 9:42 am

    Hi Vivian I also have osteoporosis and cataracts. over the last few years my eyesight was improving till 2 years ago now my right eye is driving me crazy. I had a mini stroke in my right eye. I read that eating blueberries is good for the eyes and heart. I have 4 dogs so I do have to walk every day, sometimes run, i also love dancing. I have always done some kind of exersize but it seems it hasn’t helped much. I do have a good figure though and can still wear a bikini. I’m 73.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 3:49 pm

      Helena, that is very admirable! :)

  21. James February 24, 2014, 9:37 am

    I have had 2 cataract surgeries and also have osteoporosis in early 50′s. I have discovered the the 2 are related, although nobody will tell you that.

  22. Anne C. February 24, 2014, 9:31 am

    Time for a new eye doctor, Vivian! We do not have to put up with such attitudes, which are all too common. It is well worth changing, and I had good results recently by telling the new doctor (and then the old one, when I transferred records) exactly why I am changing, of course in a nice way, but clearly. I knew I had found a good new doc when she said “I need you to be an informed, participating patient!” Good luck and thanks for your informative materials and site.
    Anne in Florida

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 3:51 pm

      Thanks Anne! I am so glad you’ve found a doctor who wants you to be informed. And good for you for letting your former doctor know why you left! Maybe that will cause him or her to think twice with other patients. :)

  23. pam February 24, 2014, 9:06 am

    Vivian, I went to the eye doctor for a routine exam and the doc reluctantly told me I no longer need glasses at all and I am almost 20/20. He said ” this will not last and your eyesight will get bad again in 5 years! ” THIS is what give doctors a bad name!

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 3:51 pm

      Wow Pam! That’s wonderful about your eyesight.

  24. melanie February 24, 2014, 9:00 am

    Is jumping on a trampoline considered a weight bearing activity that increases bone density? If yes, is it as effective as moderate walking and vigorous (running) exercise for increasing bone density and preventing cataracts?

  25. Betty February 24, 2014, 8:54 am

    I have been told I have “baby cataracts”. So I presume as I continue to age (am in my 73rd yr.) that they will enlarge and require surgery. Quite a few of my friends have had this procedure, some with complications but the majority very successfully. So I am hoping that what I am trying to do for my bones by eating healthfully will also help other areas of my body. I will be making an appt. for bone density today and my last one said severe Osteoporosis. I am over due for one. In 2013 I had two significant and extremely painful back crises. Have a good day everyone.

  26. gwin February 24, 2014, 8:50 am

    Hi Vivian – I am not a big defender of doctors since I am a nurse I have seen it all but one thing I think happens A LOT is that doctors don’t like to “dumb it down” and they think the patient will mis-understand and they don’t know to whom they are speaking or what that person may or may not know and how they will misinterpret what the doctor said. I try to communicate CAREFULLY reading the other person but still the patients don’t HEAR what we in the helping professions actually say. They either have little or no background so even things we think are obvious are not so they HEAR the wrong thing!! Now your doctor should have known who you are and what your background is and spoken to you appropriately but perhaps she didn’t realize. THANK YOU for your hard work and dedication. Keep it up! ~gwin

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA February 24, 2014, 2:03 pm

      Thanks for your “insider” view, Gwin!! I’m so glad you’re a part of this community :)

  27. Rosemary February 24, 2014, 7:57 am

    I agree Vivian with your assessment of some Doctors, not all of them. Some are very open, others closed down. We can’t take control of our health if we’re afraid of bad news. Some things can be caught right at the start and reversed, if only we knew. And some things can be easily fixed by just taking the right vitamin, or eliminating a wrong vitamin, or a change in what we eat. It could be just that easy.

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