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Prolia Pros And Cons

prolia

At only 2 years out from FDA approval, Prolia (generic name, denosumab) is still considered a new treatment – so the pros and cons are still being weighed and considered by patients, doctors, and researchers. It’s only fair to point out some of the attributes of Prolia; in this way, you can be prepared for the glowing reports about Prolia that you’ll likely hear from your doctor. After reading this, you’ll be able to see these pros in the proper light when they are presented to you. Prepare for the pros and learn the cons – think of it as studying for a test!

The Pros

  • It’s new. This implies that it’s the product of the latest research, and that past problems with similar drugs have been considered and corrected. Patients are led to believe that this brand new drug is the “latest thing.”
  • It’s convenient. Prolia is administered in just 2 shots a year rather than a pill every day.
  • The digestive system is avoided, since Prolia is administered as a shot. The unpleasant (and sometimes debilitating) digestive side effects of other osteoporosis medications are well-known, making Prolia seem like a welcome change.
  • Prolia works where other osteoporosis medications fail. This ties in with Prolia being new – it’s held out as a hope for those who have had bad luck with other osteoporosis drugs.

The Cons

  • It’s new. Yes, this was listed in the pros, but Prolia’s newness is most definitely a double-duty characteristic of the drug. The fact that it’s new means that it has only been tested in the lab, not in humans. This is why drugs get pulled off the market; no one really knows the extent of the dangers until the drug has been released to the public for several years. Do you really want to take part in a trial to determine the effectiveness and safety of a drug?
  • Potentially serious side effects are a definite con. If I listed all of them here under the “cons” list, then it would be a very long list indeed. So I am sticking to the most alarming.
    Infections, sometimes severe, particularly in the ear, abdominal region, bladder, and skin (due to the way Prolia affects the immune system)
  • Hypocalcemia, which means low blood calcium. This is more than just a mineral deficiency; hypocalcemia can cause terrible pain and muscle cramps, and it is your body’s alarm system that the calcium in your body is in the wrong place.

  • Inflammation of the heart’s inner lining
  • Osteocrenosis, or a severe infection of the jaw bone. Patients who experience deep, unrelenting pain after receiving Prolia have found that they need dental work due to the discomfort and pain in their teeth and jaw. This dental work, which your body translates as trauma, can lead to literal death (“necrosis”) of the jaw bone. Treatment is difficult and may result in permanent disfigurement.
  • It’s a drug. Drugs are for people with serious illnesses and/or medical conditions, and osteoporosis is not a disease. Prolia is, by its nature, an inappropriate treatment for osteoporosis.

Despite all the horrible side effects, this last point really sums up Prolia’s list of pros and cons. It’s a drug, and osteoporosis does not need drugs to treat it, period. Post-menopausal bone loss is not a disease; it’s simply a change in body chemistry that requires a change in diet and lifestyle to accommodate it. It’s that simple! If you’re still not sure, sign up for The Natural Bone Building Handbook. It’s free, and you’ll learn a lot about what you can do for your bones through natural means. From supplements to foods to exercise, there are all kinds of options for getting your osteoporosis under control. As you learn, you’ll probably want to take the next step and try the whole Save Our Bones Program. There’s no room left for a list of pros for this program! I can list the cons of the Save Our Bones Program, though: none.

Healthy bones are within your reach. Go for it!

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16 comments. Leave Yours Now →

  1. David H. Zirkle June 14, 2014, 12:11 am

    My wife died in January 2014 at the age of 77. There is no question in our family that the 2 injections she received of Prolia combined with her doctor’s failure to deal with the resulting side effects of serious skin rashes and almost intolerable itching contributed to her death. She died of Pancreatic Cancer and we now notice that this cancer is listed as a side effect of Prolia.

  2. Jeannette Scheurer October 1, 2013, 11:58 pm

    My doctor thinks I should take Prolia since I fractured my back in May. Upon reading the above comments – I don’t think so.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA October 2, 2013, 5:22 pm

      I don’t blame you, Jeannette. And good for you for recognizing that it’s your decision, not your doctor’s!

  3. Kate Post July 2, 2013, 10:45 am

    I was diagnosed with high-risk osteoporosis 7 years ago and have been on Fosamax since then. The bone specialist I go to has now taken me off Fosamax because I’ve reached the “unsafe” period. I am to wait until next year when I will then be put on Prolia. I am very reluctant to take Prolia as it seems to have more cons than pros. I would appreciate any advice.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA July 2, 2013, 2:15 pm

      Kate, I am glad you’ve found this post so you can read up on Prolia. Remember, it’s your health and your body – you do not have to take any drug if you are not comfortable with it. The Save Our Bones Program offers a safe alternative! :)

  4. Irene Jewett June 29, 2013, 12:36 am

    After suffering from severe (what I thought was) muscle pain for years and after taking Fosamax for quite a long period, both of my thigh/hip bones broke. I now have a lot of metal in both legs. When I was being treated for the breaks I was told the FDA finally said it “was possible” Fosamax could possibly cause thigh bone cracking or breaks. Now my doctor says my bone scan (of my back as it is not possible now to scan my leg bones) shows osteoporosis and wants me to do the Prolia which she says is safe and much different from Fosamax. Besides this I did the self shots in the abdamon (Forteo) for two years again a supposedly treatment for osteoporosis. HELP HELP HELP I refuse to take anymore of this osteoporosis meds,

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 29, 2013, 8:34 am

      Irene, I am so glad you’re here! Please feel free to peruse this site as you do your osteoporosis drug research. I don’t blame you at all for refusing to take the osteoporosis drugs! I refused to take them, too, which is how the Save Our Bones Program came about. :)

  5. anna April 19, 2013, 12:07 am

    I have saveourbones program book which is excellent. According to my MD my bones are really bad. I’m only 59 and have osteoporosis and was told that my femur could just shatter walking. I have been recmmended to take drugs but decided against them. I’m just concerned if I’m in danger when doing some of the exercises in your book. any suggestions would be greatly appreciated….thanks

  6. anna April 19, 2013, 12:01 am

    I have saveourbones program book which is excellent. According to my MD my bones are really bad. I’m only 59 and have osteoporosis and was told that my femur could just shatter walking. It was recommended to take Actonel or Prolia. I’m not taking either. I’m just concerned if I’m in danger when doing some of the exercises in the book. any suggestions would be greatly appreciated….thanks

  7. nellie teske April 6, 2013, 12:31 pm

    Had infusion of prolia and have had sudden loss of 80% of my hair and have joint pain too. I will never take treatment again. I will increase good nutrition and go the homeopathic way of living concerning my bones. I truly feel that this drug not at all safe and will in long run make more problems than its worth. I am a retired nurse, and I have battled breast cancer– eight year survivor and thru all my treatments this med has caused me the same level of discomfort and problems systemically the chemo therapy did. Not for me thats for sure. The FDA should seriously re-evaluate this med.

  8. Vivian Goldschmidt, MA March 9, 2013, 8:13 am

    To all of you who have written in about your personal experience with osteoporosis drug side effects – my heart aches for you. I am so sorry you have to deal with these issues! But you can get the drugs out of your system, and there is hope. This is why I wrote Rapid Cleanse, and I encourage you to check it out here:

    http://saveourbones.com/rapid-cleanse/

    This is also why I wrote the entire Save Our Bones Program! There’s just no need to suffer these terrible side effects. Hang in there, and take your health into your own hands!

  9. Deborah thomas March 8, 2013, 11:29 pm

    I have had such terrible side effects, I am in such pain. I have sciatica in my left hip , down
    My leg that it encapscites me from daily activities. If I bend over, to empty the dishwasher’
    The pain goes on for hours. My stomach has really been giving me such pain, I don’t want to eat. Actually, it’s my lower intestinal tract. You could not pay me the moneyb my insurance
    Paid to be in such pain.

  10. Charlotte March 3, 2013, 2:00 pm

    Received Prolia Dec 2012 after having two years of Reclast and 12 years of Actonel. My dentist discovered bone grown into my teeth and a periodontist cut my gums down to try and fix. Unable to fix due to barely a shell left for each tooth, he recommended extraction. My dentist says an oral surgeon will have to do. Once I get a partial and hopefully a permanent bridge later, will the bone continue to grow up from my jaw bone? None of this was foreseen by my dentist. It just showed up in my last x-ray. Anyone have any knowledge about this?

  11. Kathy February 27, 2013, 11:43 pm

    I received the prolia shot last week and have not felt well since. I started hurting everywhere the next day, even the top of my head. My left ear and the left side of my neck hurt a lot and as of this writing my ear still hurts. I was so sick that yesterday I nearly passed out and had to miss work. I missed again today because my ear still hurts and the top of my head feels funny. Not a good thing because I am self employed and not working means no money. I felt fine before the shot last Wednesday (a week ago t

  12. joyce sherwood December 9, 2012, 7:30 pm

    i recently received my second Prolia shot. After the first shot I really did not have a lot of side effects. This time tho I have had upset stomach, general ill feeling but the worst is the back pain and sciatia pain. I will make an appointment with my Dr. as soon as I can, but was wondering if others have had this problem and what can be done anyway? My Dr. tells me that Prolia in in my system for6?? months then gone…True? I took Forteo for 2 years.That is as long as you can be on it, but Dr. was thrilled with bone improvement…Tried to take Actonel but botherd my stomach..Personally I would like to get off all this stuff and try natural remedies..Is it too late? I am also on calcium and Vit.D 3 as well as Metropol tarte and losartan for hypertension. I just don’t want to keep adding pills to my life if there are other things to try.

  13. Marcy Oberli October 9, 2012, 4:36 pm

    I have osteoporosis. I have had 2 fractured vertebrae.. I was on Reclast until I started having attacks of gout. I am now taking Prolia.
    I am a patient of Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, FL.

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