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The Power Of The Sesame Seed

sesame-seeeds

It sounds kind of crazy. “Powerful sesame seed” certainly seems like an oxymoron, but this tiny seed offers so much more than a distinct nutty flavor. It is a powerhouse of organic minerals, especially calcium, and is an alkaline food that supports bone and general health. That’s exactly why Sesame Seeds made it to the list of ‘Foundation Foods’ in the Save Our Bones Program.

Sesame seeds add texture to baked goods, a nutty flavor to sushi rolls, stir-fries and salads, and ground sesame seeds are used to make delicious and nutritious spreads like tahini, hummus and sesame butter. Plus, I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who doesn’t like them.

The Hard Facts about Sesame Seeds

Sesame seeds are full of calcium, magnesium, copper, vitamin B1, zinc and dietary fiber. They offer the most nutritional value when the entire seed is used (un-hulled).

Whole sesame seeds contain about 88 mg of calcium per tablespoon of seeds. Just a quarter cup of natural sesame seeds provides more calcium than a whole cup of milk. A quarter cup of raw natural sesame seeds has 351 mg of calcium while one cup of non-fat milk has 316.3 mg, and one cup of whole milk has only 291 mg of calcium. Plus, they are alkaline whereas milk is acidic.

Sesame seeds are also rich in zinc, another mineral that has a positive effect on bone mineral density. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found a correlation between low dietary intake of zinc and osteoporosis at the hip and spine.1

Copper, better known for its anti-inflammatory ability shown to reduce some of the pain and swelling of rheumatoid arthritis, is also a supporter of bone and blood vessel health.

More than Just Bone Health

While calcium is vital to bone health, it also can help with migraines2 and provide relief for PMS.3

These multi-tasking seeds are also rich in sesamin and sesamolin, fibers called lignans that can lower cholesterol and help prevent high blood pressure.4

As if you need another reason to make sesame seeds a pantry staple, they are a great source of phytosterols, plant sterols that have also been shown to lower blood cholesterol5 and improve heart health.6

Processing and Cooking

Keep in mind, how a food is processed and cooked changes its nutritional value. For example, the calcium level decreases about 60 percent when the hulls are removed from the sesame seed; however, the form of calcium in the hulls is calcium oxalate, a less absorbable form of calcium.

The actual harm of removing the hull is debatable. When the seed is crushed, as in tahini or sesame butter, its nutrients are more easily digested. When left whole, the seeds do not break down as well during digestion.

Toasting or roasting sesame seeds alter their nutritional value. Studies show that the calcium levels are slightly higher when the seeds are toasted. For example, one could get 27 percent of their daily value of calcium in one ounce of whole sesame seeds, but 28 percent if the seeds are roasted. Likewise, one ounce of hulled raw kernels will get give you 2 percent of your daily value of calcium. That number doubles when the kernels are toasted.

Small Seeds, Big Taste

Okay, you get it, they’re healthy! But there’s more, because sesame seeds are also delicious. If you think that a bakery roll is the only way to serve sesame, you are missing out. Toasted or raw seeds (whole or hulled) can be added to steamed broccoli (a veggie rich in calcium), stir-fried green beans, put on top of salads and in dressings, sprinkled on baked goods, and mashed and ground into condiments and spreads. Try using sesame seeds in place of acidifying breadcrumbs.

During my travels to the Middle East, I learned many uses of sesame, both culinary and medicinal. One of my go-to snacks to this day is tahini. It’s a wonderful paste made of sesame seeds that you can use in spreads, dressings, sauces, or all by itself on crackers and toast. You can even use it as a dip with fruits and veggies.

To get started with sesame seeds, here’s my favorite and simple tahini recipe. Enjoy!

Treasure Trove Tahini

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 4 cups

Ingredients:

5 cups sesame seeds (hulled)
1½ cups olive oil

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350. Toast sesame seeds for 5-10 minutes, tossing the seeds frequently with a spatula. Do not allow to brown. Cool for 20 minutes. 

Pour sesame seeds into food processor and add oil. Blend for 2 minutes. Check for consistency. The goal is a thick, yet pourable texture. Add more oil and blend until desired consistency. 


Storing Tahini:

Tahini should be stored in the refrigerator in a tightly closed container. It will keep for up to 3 months.

Want More Delicious Foundation Foods and Recipes?

Sesame seeds are just one example of the bone-building power houses that are all around us. That’s why I developed the list with over 160 ‘Foundation Foods’ that you can mix-and-match to accelerate your bone building progress.

For the complete list and for more simple recipes, be sure to check out the Save Our Bones Program.

References

1 Hyun T., Barrett-Connor E., Milne D. ; “Zinc intakes and plasma concentrations in men with osteoporosis: the Rancho Bernardo Study”. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 80, No. 3, 715-721. September 2004.
2 Thys-Jacobs S, “Alleviation of Migraines with Therapeutic Vitamin D and Calcium”. Headache: the Journal of Head and Face Pain. Volume 34 Issue 10, 590 – 592. May 2005.
3 Thys-Jacobs S, “Micronutrients and the Premenstrual Syndrome: The Case for Calcium”. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Vol. 19, No. 2, 220-227. 2000.
4 Adlercreutz H. “Lignans and human health”. Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Vol 44, 483-525, 2007.
5 Ostlund, R. E., Jr, Racette, S. B., and Stenson, W. F. “Inhibition of cholesterol absorption by phytosterol-replete wheat germ compared with phytosterol-depleted wheat germ.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 77, No. 6, 1385 – 1589. 2003.
6 Kritchevsky, D. Phytosterols: Dietary fiber in Health and Disease. (Eds.) Kristchevsky and Bonfield., Plenum Press, New York, 427: 235 – 242. 1997.

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101 comments. Leave Yours Now →

  1. Anahata June 7, 2014, 10:15 pm

    hi ..I am wondering about the calcium in tahini..I have heard the calcium is in the form calcium oxalate and I have heard this form of calcium is not good for the kidneys. I am just wondering because I eat a lot of tahini..it is almost like a staple in my diet. But 3 of my family members have suffered from kidney ailments..don’t have a problem so far, but I am wondering about this. Also tahini can make me feel euphoric..wonder what that is ..

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 8, 2014, 2:50 pm

      Anahata, homemade tahini can be alkalizing and bone-healthy! Store-bought tahini is acidifying due to the additives. Here’s a post with a recipe for Treasure Trove Tahini that you might enjoy and feel better about eating! :)

      http://saveourbones.com/the-power-of-the-sesame-seed/

  2. Letty January 23, 2014, 12:19 am

    I have a question regarding Black tahini and the white tahini butter. I just purchased a jar of raw black tahini at whole foods. There was also a beige color looking tahini but I saw that it mentioned butter and something else, so I went with the raw black tahini. What exactly is the difference? Should I cut the serving in half when a recipe calls for tahini?

    Thank you

  3. Joanne Boutsikaris December 27, 2013, 8:56 am

    Is it healthier to eat sesame seeds that are organic.

  4. rani December 11, 2013, 4:53 am

    we know that milk is acidic but if we mix ginger, turmeric and papper corn in milk, boil it and then drink it, suggest me yet is it harmful for bone ,is it remain acidic . thank you . please give the answer

  5. william winter October 3, 2013, 7:09 pm

    hi i have been told sesame seed paste is good for your kidneys and blader

    is this right i was getting a lot of water infections after i had my prostate removed

    i would most interested in your reply. regards william

  6. merryam September 20, 2013, 1:33 pm

    excuse me 100g of seasame seeds = 600mg of calcium
    and 100g of milk = 143mg calcium

    • Elizabeth January 19, 2014, 7:55 am

      HOw well is the calcium from sesame seeds absorbed by the body?

  7. Connie August 26, 2013, 10:40 am

    I have a quick question.
    I hear that grounding them is the best way to eat them, but I also have read that one you do that they start to loose there nutrients. I like to do large amounts to make it easy to keep them on hand. Do you know if putting the ground up seeds in the freezer would keep the nutrients in them longer??

  8. Bridie August 22, 2013, 4:19 am

    My health practitioner told me to ground sesame seeds as they can’t be digested cos of the hull left on, and they just pass through you, she also advised putting them in my porrdge as they bind our stools together is this not the case.

  9. Myra August 14, 2013, 2:21 pm

    Start of article says they Are most nutritious unhulled. But lare says most easily digested when crushed as in tahini. Not sure which one you mean is better. Thank you

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 15, 2013, 7:35 am

      Hi Myra,
      As you probably noticed in the rest of the article, the nutritional benefits of leaving on or removing the hull are debatable. I know it can seem confusing! But the gist of it is this: there are more nutrients present in un-hulled sesame seeds, but they are not as bioavailable (absorbed by the body) as the nutrients in the slightly less nutritious hulled sesame seeds. I hope that makes sense! :) As with so many foods, the key is to eat a variety of preparations and types.

  10. www.theblessedseed.com July 29, 2013, 5:29 am

    Great Article.

  11. Garland Anderson May 21, 2013, 9:12 pm

    Hi Vivian

    In your Savour Our Bones manual (book) which I have purchased you have seseme seeds as alkaline and tahini as acid. Could you please claify.
    Many Thanks.

    • Yvonne Delnis February 12, 2014, 5:11 pm

      Hi Vivian –
      I just purchased the Save Our Bones book and have the same question as Garland. Wondering why tahini is acidic if sesame seeds are alkaline.
      Could you please clarify?
      Thank you!

  12. Agnieszka May 20, 2013, 11:47 am

    Dear Vivian,
    There has been a lot of controversial discussions about oxalates recently. Sesame seeds and almonds are on the top of the list…(Not to mention celery and leeks…) What is your opinion about oxalates in those foods and their negative impact on the bones?
    Thank you so much for the fantastic work you do!
    All the best,
    Agnieszka

  13. Oluwatoyin James April 13, 2013, 9:47 am

    Tnx Vivan, i just bought roasted sesame seed from a store out of curiosity & ate today & decided to go online to knw more about it am glad i cme across your articles on the seed & am enlightened.

  14. Mr. Khaliofa B.A.S. April 7, 2013, 6:47 am

    I Would like to join your leage in order to be more and more tided to this modern league to shre upmost benfit to all

  15. Serena January 22, 2013, 4:37 am

    Thank you for this very interesting article! I love sesame seeds, they are healthy and they taste great! I made a steamed vegetable stock adding sesame seeds and it’s just delicious! Here is the recipes: http://foodfulife.wordpress.com

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA January 22, 2013, 2:30 pm

      Thank you for sharing that, Serena!

  16. Alannah October 1, 2012, 12:12 am

    Did you mention the importance of reducing phytic acid in order to help improve vitamin and mineral absorption from sesame seeds, nuts, grains, legumes, beans? Did you explain the importance also of soaking grains, nuts, seeds (sesame seeds also), legumes and beans, and sprouting? These activites (soaking and sprouting), it turns out, greatly enhance the bioavailability and absorption of the vitamins and minerals in these foods. I am just learning about this, and thought that your readers and possibly you might also appreciate this added info. The Gerson Therapy Diets also help to rebuild bones and teeth. It’s good to know that we do have options that can help us to reverse the effects our years of “unintentionally uninformed or unintentionally misinformed” choices.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA January 22, 2013, 2:56 pm

      Thank you for your contribution, Alannah! I absolutely agree with the healthful properties of sprouted grains and seeds.

  17. Silvana August 23, 2012, 10:57 pm

    I have been eating sesame seeds for some time, as well as flax seeds. I know that flax seeds need to be ground to be absorbed, otherwise they go right through you. I’m thinking could this apply to sesame seeds as well. Any info on this?

  18. May June 13, 2012, 1:25 pm

    thank you very much for the article published, I much grateful for the uses and importance of the sesame seed. I will like to know more thank you. Since I want to live as a pure vegetarian.

  19. Noel Broomhall July 28, 2011, 8:58 am

    Tahini is a great addition to those soups which are served “creamy” – no cream or milk needed – just blend in Tahini , to Carrot, pumpkin, sweet potato (etc) soups – delicious!

  20. Usha July 14, 2011, 11:05 am

    Vivian Dear,

    Thanks for all the information on “Sesame”” seeds & oil. Is it OK for diabetics?.

    In India, Sesame seeds are widely used. it is only now that I have come to know the other side of ‘sesame seeds’ – I mean other than just the taste!

    I enjoy reading and seeing your video programs. Wish i could meet you some day. Come to India.

    Love.

    Usha.

  21. Lucy Sagastegui April 12, 2011, 3:02 pm

    I always enjoy all the good information that you share with us and I enjoed your book, It really opened my eyes to the fact that many doctors dont want to give you a more natural way to increase the bone density.
    The recipes you share are great, but I must restrict my use of sugar, I use Stevia, but some recipes call for a lot of furts and the like, I wish you would take into consideration the fact that some people can’t use a lot of sweets, and give us alternates.

    Thank you so much for your dedication.

    Best wishes,
    Lucy

  22. doris March 3, 2011, 10:56 am

    Could you tell me the benifit of taking Chia seeds every day. Is it good for bones. It has calcium. And also taking Pre Mixed Greens.

  23. Rich February 26, 2011, 6:17 pm

    I buy my sesame seeds from Whole Foods. I store them in a glass bottle in the refrigerator. One of the snacks that I enjoy a great deal is to scatter some seeds in the skillet and heat up until they start popping(a minute or two). Then I pour the heated seeds into a small bowl and add a 1/4 teaspoon of virgin olive oil to it. Wow, is it delicious!! You can also add a little bit of sea salt or ground coriander.

    Thanks Vivian for putting your stamp of approval on a snack that I really enjoyed before I knew all of the health benefits.

    Rich

  24. Adele Hause October 16, 2010, 8:28 am

    I love the email help I get from you. I now am in the donut hole with Femara a breast cancer med that increases osteoporosis so one is supposed to do the zomeda. I am going to try some alternatives which you suggest I have learned so much. Thanks. I found also being in Europe, 3 weeks without dairy, that my leg cramps stopped! So another change – no milk- is going to occur.

  25. Sylvia October 14, 2010, 6:25 am

    Thank you for all the information you provide. I eat bread with sesame seeds and I eat Tahini because I like them but I never thought they were so good for the bones. I am so grateful that you are sharing your knowledge with us.

  26. Margaret September 21, 2010, 6:55 pm

    I have been reading all the info on here and I am suprised that I have osteo, as I have ate these things all my life, I am a fruit and nuts person who eats very little meat, but love salads and all that goes with it, yet at 66 I have been diagnosed as having the bone density of a woman of 90. The only thing I can think of that may be the cause of my ailment is the fact that at a young age I was involved in a serious accident and had numerous operations on my legs over a period of 17 years. no one else in the family has the problem and eat what they want with no consideration to what goes inside of them??????????? It certainly makes me wonder.

    • Fiona October 21, 2012, 2:02 am

      Hi Margaret,

      I am sorry to hear you have osteoporosis. As I read your comment I could ‘hear’ how deflated you are by a condition that is reversible (although, most doctors will tell you otherwise). You might want to do some research on maca. People with your condition have improved bone density with maca, a cruciferous root vegetable from South America, on just a teaspoon a day. It can be purchased organically as a powder and is not expensive.

      Food wise cucumber and celery are also excellent sources of silica which has been shown to be more important than calcium due to it’s transmutation character.

      Please do not take calcium supplements. They are generally mined out of Mexico and are inorganic, meaning they are not a form of calcium we can use in the body. The calcium from calcium pills only serves to calcify (age) the body. The calcium from plants is very different and is required for health.

      Best wishes
      Fiona

  27. Carole August 29, 2010, 7:47 pm

    It’s still best to take calcium supplements,,,isn’t it?

  28. toni dreiling August 9, 2010, 12:13 pm

    Thanks for article on sesame seeds. I have appreciated eating halvah (made of these little seeds crushed) for many years. But it is hard to find. I used to get it in 5 or 6 pound bars but can’t find it that way anymore. Some food stores have it in 8 oz. packets, but rarely. The box used to have 2 large bars, it froze very nicely and on the side of the box it noted, Hoyva or Joyva, can’t remember for certain. I’d be glad to order it if I could find a reliable source. Any comments on halva? or info on where to get it in USA? Recently visited Isarel and it was serve there on a daily breakfast buffet.
    Thanks,

    • Mollie Aezen February 25, 2013, 1:28 pm

      sales/parthenonfoods.com They sell halva that looks like the kind you would find in the older delies. I have ordered, not yet received it yet, but can’t wait.

    • Robin August 22, 2012, 8:25 pm

      Just read your post in which you were talking about a halva that you used to eat that you think was called “Joyva”. There is a website for this product at; http://www.joyva.com/ Also if you type “buy halva” into the search bar you will find many places that sell it. Amazon sells Joyva halva products. Just remember that Halva will have real sugar in it-just mentioned that in case that would be off-putting.

  29. bingaux August 2, 2010, 6:09 pm

    I am wondering if rye sprouts (tasteful with a nutty flavor) are nutritionally helpful in a SAVEOURBONES diet? Do you have any opinion on them?
    THANK YOU Vivian for sharing your wisdom.

    • Patrecia Frederick August 8, 2010, 11:01 am

      This is very good knowledge. Fortunately I allreadly have some knowledge of this. Sesame seeds also helps the colon to aid in digestion.

  30. bingaux August 2, 2010, 6:03 pm

    I am wondering if rye sprouts (tasteful with a nutty flavor) are nutritionally helpful in a SAVEOURBONES diet? Do you have any opinion on them?

  31. forooz August 1, 2010, 2:28 pm

    I am very impressed by save our bones program. I have a question about processing the sesame seeds; i read the label on Tahini in the health food market and found that it had only 4% ca, whereas according to this article, the natural seeds have a lot more. I like Tahini and want to know if I should just eat the whole seeds (black or cream-colored?) for more calcium? and if black seeds are unhulled ? and cream ones are hulled?

  32. Donna July 28, 2010, 12:36 am

    I ate sesame seeds in the past. Best start again !! this is my 1st day on U site I love all this info Mahalo Maraiya

  33. myrtle July 6, 2010, 3:46 pm

    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR ALL THE RECIPES & E-MAILS.
    I FEEL SO MUCH BETTER SINCE I HAVE STOPPED ALL
    OSTEO. DRUGS.
    WISH I HAD HEARD OF YOU BEFORE MY FALL IN THE
    SHOWER — THANKS TO ” ACTONEL”
    I HAVE A VERY PAINFUL BACK NOW & MY PHYSICIAN
    TELLS ME THERE IS NOTHING TO HELP.
    HAVE ENJOYED YOUR SAVE OUR BONES BOOK.

    Mert

  34. Elaine Schaeffer July 2, 2010, 10:21 pm

    Thank you for the infor for sesame seeds. I am behind on reading but it is exciting catching up and going to try the tahini shortly. Thanks Elaine

  35. Karen July 2, 2010, 2:13 pm

    Thanks for your article on the sesame seed. Recently I’ve found I just love hummus on crackers. The Tahini is very expensive in the store and with your showing us how to I can now make this dish economically. Also I’m very grateful to you in helping all of us with your program. It has shown me with a little planning that I can eat so much better than I ever thought I could. Keep up the good work.

    • nafila amily August 7, 2010, 7:55 pm

      thank you very much for all articals

  36. Irma July 1, 2010, 3:03 pm

    Hello Vivian, I got your e-mail on the Sesame Seed, Thank so much, i love the little seed, now I will eat more of them. And Thanks for the info. on the Cucumber, I will try the salad. All of your Tips are very beneifical,on increasing Bone Density.

    Thanks
    Irma

  37. VERI June 26, 2010, 8:32 pm

    Hola mi querida Vivian: Me entere que que tu hablas varios idiomas, me alegro mucho porque asi podemos comunicarnos mejor,claro que yo vivo en Canada pero no es lo mismo que hablar en mi idioma yo lo entindo y lo hablo bien pero para escribir en ingles se me dificulta, pero enfin queria darte las gracias por tus a-mails, te cuento que yo hace mas de 15 anos me dagnosticaron que tenia OSTeOPENIA PRIMERO PERO AHORA TENGO UNA SEVERA osteoporis me han sersrvido mucho tus consejos en tu seccion gracias VERI

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 26, 2010, 10:34 pm

      De nada, Veri!

  38. Maria J.Mckenney June 17, 2010, 11:15 pm

    Hola Vivian, acabo de ver acerca de ti que tu hablas varios idiomas y vives en el Sur de Florida. Yo soy from Bogota, Colombia South America. Tu me podrias escribir en Espanol? Es mas facil para mi. Tengo una hemana en Bogota, que queria saber de ti, pues ella tiene mas osteoporosis que yo. Pues a ella le sacaron los ovarios muy joven, los medicos no le dieron hormonas y cuando se dieron cuenta tenia su columna vuelta nada. Ella es casada, vive tomando medicinas vegetarianas. Pobrecita, tiene problemas con su esposo por este problema, pues el es un hombre machista. Ella esta un poco encorbada y sufre por esto. Ella era muy bonita, pero se ha desmejorado y sufre por esto. Gracias Vivian.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 26, 2010, 10:33 pm

      Maria, por lastima todavia no he traducido el programa Save Our Bones. Tengo planeado hacerlo en el futuro :)

  39. Nancy Millway June 16, 2010, 7:29 am

    Thanks for the timely reminder, Vivian. As a vegetarian, I used to make sesame patties with freshly ground seeds when my children were young. They were always very popular, and we had them either with salad or with steamed vegetables for our main meal. I also used to make a sesame loaf, which could be sliced and eaten either hot or cold. As sesame seeds contain oil, I have always stored them in an airtight container in the refrigerator to minimise the potential for rancidity. I live in Queensland, Australia, and our summers particularly are hot and humid. I also refrigerate flour and other fresh seeds, rice etc for the same reason, and to avoid larvae and moths. I always enjoy receiving your e-mails, great information, keep it coming! i have your book, and love the programme
    Kind regards
    Nancy

  40. Nicola Freeman June 12, 2010, 7:08 am

    I received your book recently and it is by far and away the best book out there for explaining in a concise and clear manner how to manage a hopefully reverse Osteoporsis. I especially like the chapter on the acid alkaline balance. I am desperate to know where to buy the perfect all round supplement, at the moment I am taking a handful of tabs everyday and would love to be able to cut this down. Your advise would be much appreciated.

    Many thanks
    Nicky

  41. Anna June 11, 2010, 6:22 pm

    Hi Vivian.You are a joy to the osteoporosis community and we are blessed with an angel to find out all the goodies that we can eat to keep our bones fit and strong!!!!!!Sesame chicken from my chinese restaurant will definitely be my choice in the future!!!!! Thanx for being you!!!!!! All the best Anna

  42. Beverley June 10, 2010, 8:24 pm

    I have the Save-our-Bones program, so knew of the value of sesame seeds. am glad to learn more, as in whether or not to grind or toast.

    Where can I get some? My only resource is those 2 ounce spice jars which would be very expensive with any volume.

  43. Bula Chick June 10, 2010, 9:42 am

    Good morning! For breakfast I eat raw oatmeal with ground sesame seed,pumpkin seeds,sunflower seeds,chia seeds, sometimes hemp seeds,and sprinkle whey protein powder, add a little Rice Milk and there is my ready to start the day breakfast.
    Article on sesame seeds was great to read all the benefits of those little seeds!!
    THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR HELP.

    • Patricia Scrubb January 3, 2011, 8:19 pm

      I will like info on what to take for help with my hereditary diseases,neuro-fibro-matosis and charcot-marie-tooth, right now the nerves in my right hand is getting worse it’s numb and not much feelings in it. Which liquid calcium should I take for my osteoporosis–penia–osteoporic,?. my bones seem to be getting weaker and weaker my DR. prescribed Fosamax, but knowing the side effects I am afraid to take any. Hope to hear from you soon.

  44. slavica June 10, 2010, 7:53 am

    Hi Vivian,
    I love to read your emails,you are helping me to help my mother,I am hoping she is going to improve her bones density.

    Thank you very much.Slavica

  45. Marilia Smith June 9, 2010, 9:19 pm

    Hi Vivian,
    Thank you so much for the information about sesame seed. I’m goig to try your recipe for tahini. Love your emails

  46. Joyce June 9, 2010, 2:23 am

    I liked Annie’s comment about Prunes. I am quite new to everything about Osteoporosis and to read about Sesame Seeds, and now Prunes, being good for us, is wonderful.
    Thank you for “The Natural Bone Building Guide” – I am starting to read it.

  47. Christine June 8, 2010, 12:37 pm

    I am already toasting sesame seeds and scattering them on fruit and natural yoghurt several times a day. Could I be addicted? Reply not required.

  48. Bea Justice-Salyers June 8, 2010, 1:48 am

    Dear Vivian,

    Once again you come through for us! Thanks so much for the tahini recipe.

    I value all your expert advise which I share with others.

    Please keep it coming!

    Gratefully yours,

    Bea Justice-Salyers

  49. Barbara June 6, 2010, 10:04 pm

    I am so thankful I found you. I can’t wait to get an email from you. I love sesame seeds so this is really good news. I share all this good information with anyone who will listen, including the nutritionist at the HyVee Store :)

  50. Monica June 6, 2010, 6:15 pm

    Can I eat sesame seeds with yogurt?

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 26, 2010, 10:31 pm

      Of course you can! Plain yogurt with a few banana slices, sesame seeds and granola… Yum!

  51. Mary Anne Ryan June 6, 2010, 1:13 pm

    Thank you for the information on sesame seeds but what if seeds are something I should not eat. What can I take to get the sesame seed value effect?

    Thank you

  52. Nina June 6, 2010, 11:06 am

    What do you think of calcium lactate? I hear it absorbs better.

    • Jane N June 7, 2010, 7:38 pm

      I seem to be able to keep my correct ph easier when taking calcium lactate.

  53. Sue W. June 6, 2010, 7:43 am

    Thanks for the information on sesame seeds! I found them in bulk at Whole Foods (hulled) but cannot find them unhulled. Do you know where I can look? Also, I grind my own flax seeds in a coffee grinder and sprinkle on oatmeal, plain yogurt, etc. It’s cheaper than buying ground flax seeds. I am reading your book, enjoying every email tip and eating better than ever to save my bones. I am so glad I found your website!

    • Cathy Court (UK) June 8, 2010, 6:37 am

      You can grind millet grain in a coffee grinder or similar. I make it into porridge with a pinch of salt, chopped fresh ginger and rice milk. A teaspoonful of honey goes well with it too.

  54. Nu Ly June 5, 2010, 11:49 pm

    I cook oats & potatoes with few almonds & mushrooms as a soup for my breakfast, after cook, I put one coffee spoon of Lecithin and one for Psyllium Hush, then one table spoon of black sesame powder mix with the soup. This is a healthy and rich calcium soap. I have been eating this way one year. Now I reduce my high
    blood sugar from 6.2 to 5.7, my high cholosterol from 6 to 5.6, even it is not reach to the standar, I feel happy, because I can’t avoid to attend the parties or restaurants of the elderly groups, it’s so much
    acidifying than alkalizing food over there.

    Together, you and I enjoy the Save Our Bone Program difference in life!

  55. ARLENE June 5, 2010, 4:39 pm

    Thanks for the info on Sesame Seeds. I can’t wait for your reply on prunes, acidic or alkali ?
    Arlene

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 6, 2010, 1:08 am

      Prunes are acidifying. Many fruits have the same bone-healthy antioxidants as prunes.

  56. marie hinnrichs June 5, 2010, 12:21 pm

    What is halvah listed as? It is a type of sweet bar made with sesame seeds that greek and jewish people eat. It has eggs and some sugar in it. Would that make it acidifing?

  57. Cathy Court (UK) June 4, 2010, 5:11 pm

    I’m really glad to know that sesame seeds are alkalizing and so good for you. Is tahini alkalizing too? In ‘The Bone Health Revolution’ it is down as an acidifying food so I have been cutting down on the amount I snack on. It would be lovely to be able not to worry about how much of it I eat.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 4, 2010, 5:14 pm

      Store-bought tahini is typically acidifying because it contains chemical preservatives and undesirable oils. My home-made tahini recipe is alkalizing. :)

      • estelle ogus June 4, 2010, 8:24 pm

        Thanks for info on sesame seeds. Using raw organic tahini may be the best way to get the most nutrients rfrom sesame seeds.

  58. vilma June 4, 2010, 9:51 am

    Dear Vivian, thanks a lot for this information about sesame seed. VILMA

  59. Raquel Rego June 4, 2010, 12:14 am

    Thanks so much for this info. I’m trying this great seed recipe.

  60. Lois June 3, 2010, 11:20 pm

    Dear Vivian

    I really enjoy saveoourbones program.
    I haven`t take any prescribed medicine by Dr.
    for my osteoporosis. As soon as I heard my diagnosis, I looked for natural healing method.
    And I found your program. I`m vegetarian, most of `em I have been practiced already.
    Thanks a lot. Lois

  61. Pegge Taylor June 3, 2010, 11:13 pm

    Thanks so much for the information on sesame seeds. I was so happy to come across this information and cant wait to try the recipe. Thanks again!!

  62. kelsey Fickling June 3, 2010, 9:47 pm

    Thanks again Vivian, Sesame seeds are great. I crush them (very carefully) in a mortar and pestle – I knew they are good – but I didn’t know HOW GOOD !!!! Kelsey Fickling.

  63. Dawn Miller June 3, 2010, 7:55 pm

    I wish I would have read this sooner. I just got home from Mother Earth a Health Food Store. I had no idea sesame seeds were so packed full of good nutrition or I would have looked for something with them in it. Do they make a sesame seed butter on the order of almond or sunflower butter? Oh! I received your book Vivian I really like it and though I have yet to try the recipes they look good Thanks for your help!

  64. Anne June 3, 2010, 7:19 pm

    Thankyou so much for the a m a z i n g info.
    I didn’t realize they were so full of calcium.
    Will surely be adding them to my diet.

  65. Cora June 3, 2010, 1:47 pm

    Thanks for the sesame info.
    I have read your book and am following your suggestions. My husband and I are enjoying the improved diet. I feel my bones approve and a nice side-effect is the weight lose for him.
    I have yet to see any suggestions concerning the use of organic green super foods. You know .. the powdered greens to be mixed in with juice. Being rich in Chlorophyll, mineral,etc, you would think using “greens” would be good for maintaining the acid/alkaline balance. Should I continue using it or save me money?
    Keep up the fine job. It’s encouraging.
    Cora

  66. Marysia Dunlop June 3, 2010, 1:35 pm

    Hello Vivian

    Sorry I have not responded to your emails of late, but we have just come home from the USA after spending a month there.

    I need some sleep now as we have been on our feet for well over 26 hours. I will try and respond to your future incoming mail.

    Best wishes
    Marysia

  67. Suseela Dasari June 3, 2010, 12:56 pm

    Thank you Vivian,
    You ae coming up with all variety of food sources for betterment of the world. We use sesame oil for cooking in India,make dry powder with chillies ,use them on cooked & steamed veggies,& also make sweet balls with jaggery & roasted sesame seeds together heated in pan
    You are wonderful

  68. James Longpre MD June 3, 2010, 12:29 pm

    Dr.Richard Olree in Charles Walters book (Minerals for the Genetic Code) states the importance of strontium mineral in the diet for bone formation, think cabbage, the richest food source, and supplements are available.

  69. Annette June 3, 2010, 12:29 pm

    Dear Vivian, Thanks for all you are doing to reeducate the masses. About sesame seeds, I have been confused about the calcium available in them. Because of the high level of oxalic acid, is it true the calcium is locked up and not able to be used?

  70. mary t ball June 3, 2010, 11:54 am

    Well, well, well who’d have thought those little sesame seeds the baker puts on top of my favourite bread cobs have so much nutricious value! Must avail myself of more of these little treasures from the herb shop.
    Mary.

  71. anne June 3, 2010, 11:37 am

    I am so happy to hear that my favorite “sesame seeds” is very good for you. I add these to almost everything I can. I just love the nutty flavor and to know it is so good for me is a PLUS. Thanks again for passing this info on to us. Keep the emails coming. I love hearing from you.

    Anne

  72. geneva June 3, 2010, 10:59 am

    all of your information is very informative, and I appreciate it. now I plan to purchase your book.

  73. Claire June 3, 2010, 10:51 am

    Thank you Vivian, for this wonderful article on Sesame Seeds (and for all the great articles you send).

    I am so glad I joined the “Save Our Bones” program!

  74. Isabella June 3, 2010, 10:44 am

    Vivian,
    I got your book and I’m really enjoying it.
    The recipes look delicious and so healthy. So far I have tried the vegetable soup it was delicious I can’t wait to try the other recipes.
    Have you ever thought of writing a bone heath recipe book. I would love to have a book full of healthy recipes and confident that is written by someone who I know what food is good for the bones.
    Thanks
    Isabella

  75. anita drujon June 3, 2010, 9:34 am

    My doctor told me what she put in her smoothies … so I added them to my smoothie mix … sesame seeds! They are perfect in a smoothie – by adding a slight texture to it.

  76. Veronica June 3, 2010, 7:03 am

    This is one of those ‘who knew’ pleasant surprises. I will put sesame seeds on my shopping list right now! Thanks, Vivian, for the heads up on this small but mighty nutritious seed. Enjoy your day.

  77. Robyn June 3, 2010, 6:58 am

    Vivian,
    I would like to know your take on coral calcium. I know there are so many types out there and have heard that marine grade is the better one to buy. Do you have to take an additional calcium supplement along with coral calcium?
    Thanks,
    Robyn

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA June 4, 2010, 5:16 pm

      Coral calcium is really an inorganic form of calcium. Calcium derived from marine algae is a better choice.

      • Beverley June 10, 2010, 8:35 pm

        where is it available?

  78. Annie June 3, 2010, 6:35 am

    Thanks Vivian,
    That is a good reminder about Sesame seeds.
    Marilyn Diamond has been saying in her books since the 70′s and 80′s , that Sesame seeds can prevent Osteoporosis..
    Also let us not forget to eat prunes.
    They also stimulate bone growth..

    Sunshine and Flowers,
    Annie

    • pat Paternostro June 3, 2010, 4:49 pm

      Prunes are listed as an acid?

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