Top 5 Calcium-Rich Alkalizing Foods: Part 1

I admit to playing favorites when it comes to the Save Our Bones Program’s Foundation Foods.

While I enjoy a wide variety of foods and like trying new dishes, the fact is, I find myself coming back to old favorites over and over for various reasons.

And one of those reasons is the exceptional nutrient content, particularly calcium.

The organic calcium in foods is easily absorbed, and I always recommend obtaining as much of this mineral as you can through your diet. Inorganic calcium, such as calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, di- and tri-calcium phosphate have been linked to cardiovascular problems, including heart attack – especially in the large doses found in popular supplements.

That’s why I am sharing this list of the top 5 calcium-rich, alkalizing Foundation Foods. It’s a handy reference to check when you need to up your calcium intake and/or balance your diet’s pH.

You’ll notice the following list does not include milk, although your doctor may have told you to drink it for osteoporosis. That’s because milk is so acidifying that the calcium in it is “cancelled out.” In fact, milk is so acidifying it actually causes you to lose calcium from your bones!

In Part 2, I’m going to share some delicious recipes and preparation tips for these foods. So stay tuned!

1. Almonds (whole – raw): 1/4 cup: 94 mg calcium

Almonds are actually related to peaches and apricots, and the almond tree in fruit looks similar to them. When you eat an almond, you’re eating the seed or “pit” of its fruit.

You’ll find these flavorful nuts in stores year-round, but mid-summer is when they are at the peak of their season. Almonds are excellent eaten plain, and they make a great snack to take with you anywhere. Plus they are versatile enough to be used in sweet and savory dishes.

Many people ask about roasted almonds vs. raw. As always, I recommend variety – some evidence shows that roasted almonds are more easily digested, but some key nutrients are damaged by heat; so eating them both ways assures you’re getting all that almonds have to offer.

How Almonds Help Keep Your Bones Young And Healthy

Of course, the high amount of bioavailable calcium in almonds is the most notable bone-healthy benefit. But almonds have other Foundation Supplements, such as Vitamin E, manganese, copper, and magnesium that keep your bones youthful and strong.

Almonds are one of the few alkalizing nuts, and they’re high in healthful monounsaturated fats (Omega-3s), the same type of fat found in olive oil. These fats actually promote calcium absorption and increase the youthful flexibility of bone by enhancing the synthesis of collagen.1

Almonds Are Good For Your Overall Health

The same healthy fats that promote strong bones also prevent cardiovascular disease. This is likely due to the antioxidant action of Vitamin E and to the cholesterol-reducing effect of the monounsaturated fats in almonds. In addition, almonds’ high magnesium content contributes to a healthy heart muscle.

Another heart-healthy benefit of almonds: they contain potassium but very little sodium, thereby providing a protective effect against high blood pressure and atherosclerosis.

2. Broccoli (cooked): 1 cup: 62 mg calcium; (raw): 43 mg calcium

Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable, putting it in the same category as cauliflower and cabbage. Originally from Italy, broccoli’s Latin name, Brassica oleracea, refers to its branching growth habits. The ancient Romans developed broccoli from a variety of wild cabbage. It was brought to America by Italian immigrants, where it comes into season in wintertime.

Broccoli is available year-round in most stores, and you’ll find the organic variety is not much different in price than conventionally-grown.

How Broccoli Keeps Your Bones Young And Healthy

Steamed broccoli has quite a bit of calcium, and it also contains Vitamins A and K, important precursors for Vitamin D metabolism. It’s rich in various B vitamins, manganese, Vitamin E, choline, potassium, and copper. Broccoli is full of Vitamin C as well, a Foundation Supplement that doubles as an antioxidant.

In fact, broccoli has a significant detoxifying effect on the body. It contains d-glucarate, a detoxification chemical that signals your body to “let go” of dangerous toxins. It does this by suppressing an enzyme that tells your body to “hold on” to toxins.

Did you know that broccoli also contains Omega-3 fatty acids? One cup contains about 200mgs of anti-inflammatory alpha-linoleic acids (ALAs).

Broccoli Is Good For Your Overall Health

Many Savers have concerns about thyroid health, and have been warned not to eat cruciferous vegetables. If this is a concern for you, please don’t worry! There are many other foods to choose from on the Save Our Bones Program, so you can still build stronger, younger bones through your diet.

But for those who do eat broccoli, there are many health benefits.

Broccoli is implicated strongly in cancer prevention. Research indicates this is due to broccoli’s ability to break the cancerous cycle of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress.

3. Kale (chopped – raw): 1 cup: 137 mg calcium; (cooked): 179 mg

Here’s another cruciferous vegetable that is available year-round. Like broccoli, kale descends from the wild cabbage, and was brought to Europe around 600 B.C. by itinerant Celtic people. It remained popular “peasant fare” throughout the Middle Ages, coming to America in the 17th century.

Kale is a very nutrient-dense, low-calorie food. Its season lasts from winter to early spring, during which time it has a sweeter flavor.

How Kale Keeps Your Bones Young And Healthy

Chock-full of bioavailable calcium, kale boasts other key nutrients for bones. It contains an amazing amount of the Foundation Supplement Vitamin K – 1,062 micrograms per cooked cup – which regulates osteoclast production by working synergistically with Vitamin D. The calcification of bones is actually dependent on Vitamin K, because this vitamin activates osteocalcin, a Gla protein, by chemically altering it.

Kale also contains an impressive amount of Vitamins A and C, and is rich in B vitamins, magnesium, and even Omega-3 fats.

Vitamin K is contraindicated for people on blood-thinning medication; your doctor will likely warn you about the interactions between this nutrient and whatever prescription you’re taking.

Kale Is Good For Your Overall Health

Kale is unmatched in its nutrient density and variety, and its antioxidant content and anti-inflammatory nutrients make it a top choice for cancer prevention. In addition, research now shows us how kale lowers cholesterol: the fiber in kale binds to some of the bile acids present in your intestine. The liver uses cholesterol to build bile, so when the fiber in kale binds to bile acids, the liver draws on cholesterol stores to build more bile. In other words, it keeps the cholesterol “moving” and thus lowers cholesterol levels in the blood.

4. Sesame seeds (raw): ¼ cup: 351 mg of calcium

These tiny, nutrient-rich seeds are one of my favorites, especially when they are made into tahini.

It’s said that sesame seeds are the world’s oldest condiment, having been grown since prehistory. The seeds probably originated in India, and from there they spread throughout the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Ancient Egyptians added them to bread dough. The seed pods burst open when mature – hence the expression, “Open sesame.” Sesame oil is exceptionally shelf-stable.

This tiny crunchy seed was brought to America from Africa in the late 17th century.

How Sesame Seeds Keep Your Bones Young And Healthy

I noted above that sesame seeds contain 351 mg of calcium per ¼ cup. That’s more than the calcium content of a full cup of milk!

Sesame seeds contain the powerful trio of copper, zinc, and manganese. These trace minerals work together to build Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), an essential antioxidant your bones need to be strong and flexible. SOD targets the most common free radicals, peroxide and superoxide, preventing oxidative stress and staving off the effects of aging.

Additionally, low levels of zinc are directly linked to osteoporosis of the spine and hips.2

Sesame seeds also contain the Foundation Supplements magnesium and Vitamin B1.

Sesame Seeds Are Good For Your Overall Health

The presence of sesamin and sesmolin, types of fiber, account for sesame seeds’ ability to lower cholesterol3 and prevent high blood pressure.4 These fibers also increase levels of Vitamin E in the body, and sesamin protects the liver from oxidative damage.

The copper in sesame seeds is well known for reducing arthritic pain and swelling, because copper is involved in multiple anti-inflammatory enzyme processes. Copper also plays a role in the production of collagen and elastin, which are vital for the youthful flexibility of bone and for keeping skin looking young. In addition, collagen and elastin give blood vessels crucial elasticity.

Sesame seeds’ calcium and magnesium content may help stave off migraines, and magnesium is known to restore healthful sleep patterns (especially during menopause).

We’ll talk in more detail about preparing sesame seeds for consumption in Part II, but for now I want to point out that the removal of sesame seed hulls reduces the calcium content of these seeds by more than half. But the calcium present in the hulls is calcium oxalate, which is not as bioavailable as the calcium found in the kernel (hulled seed).

5. Yogurt (plain): 1 cup: 300 mg calcium

Yes, there is a dairy product that is alkalizing and healthful for your bones!

Like the sesame seed, yogurt has been around for thousands of years. Some nomadic cultures dried their yogurt for ease of transport and to prevent spoilage.

Organic yogurt from grass-fed cows is the healthiest form of this food, because it results in higher levels of Omega-3 fats and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).

How Yogurt Keeps Your Bones Young And Healthy

While the amount of calcium varies slightly depending on the fat content, yogurt is still a rich source of this vital mineral. It contains zinc, potassium, and Vitamins B2, B5, and B12 as well.

Yogurt is full of bone-healthy probiotics, which synthesize Vitamins K, B9, and B12 (Foundation Supplements). In addition, probiotics actually increase bone density,5 most likely due to the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory effects of these “good germs.”

The probiotics in yogurt also reduce the amount of lactose present by nearly half, because the healthful bacteria break down the lactose for food.

Yogurt Is Good For Your Overall Health

Yogurt’s combination of protein and probiotics helps support healthy blood sugar levels. And yogurt boosts the immune response by stimulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines6, making yogurt an ideal addition to your diet during cold and flu season. (When it comes to the immune response, a healthy, temporary inflammatory reaction is crucial.)

Calcium From Foods Is Ideal, But Supplements Are Necessary

Now that we’ve delved into these top 5 calcium-rich foods, I need to make an important point: it’s difficult if not impossible to get all the calcium you need every day from foods.

For one thing, you may not have access to these key calcium-containing foods on a daily basis. In addition, variety is important – your bones need many nutrients to recapture their youthful tensile strength and fracture resistance. So you’ll want to focus on other nutrients on other days.

Keep in mind also that today’s modern farming methods produce foods that just don’t contain the calcium (and other nutrients) that they contained a generation ago.

That’s why a bioavailable, organic calcium supplement is crucial.

As I write in the Save Our Bones Program, 800 mg per day is all you need of organic calcium, because it is so readily absorbed.

TrueOsteo Is The Ideal Calcium Supplement

I take TrueOsteo™ as my regular calcium supplement, and I am very pleased with the results. TrueOsteo™ contains AlgaeCal, an algae-derived, marine calcium.

Unlike typical calcium supplements made from rock, AlgaeCal is made from living, organic algae, and the calcium is absorbed into your bones. In contrast, inorganic calcium can end up deposited in arteries and other tissues, because your body simply can’t use large amounts of it.

I was able to work with the manufacturers of TrueOsteo™ to bring you a 20% off coupon, exclusive for Savers. Simply enter SAVEOURBONES at checkout for 20% off on your first order!

Exclusive 20% OFF TrueOsteo™ Coupon Code for Savers!

Use coupon code: SAVEOURBONES at checkout to get 20% off your order!

Try TrueOsteo™, the perfect calcium, now →

Please note that TrueOsteo™ only ships to the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand.

I invite you to click here to learn more about TrueOsteo™.

Till next time,

hReferences

1Kruger M., Horrobin D. “Calcium metabolism, osteoporosis and essential fatty acids: A review.” Progress in Lipid Research. Volume 36. September 1997.


2Hyun T., Barrett-Connor E., Milne D. ; “Zinc intakes and plasma concentrations in men with osteoporosis: the Rancho Bernardo Study.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 80, No. 3, 715-721. September 2004.

3Hirata F, Fujita K, Ishikura Y, et al. Hypocholesterolemic effect of sesame lignan in humans. Atherosclerosis 1996 Apr 26;122(1):135-36. 1996. PMID:11740.

4Kita S, Matsumura Y, Morimoto S, et al. Antihypertensive effect of sesamin. II. Protection against two-kidney, one-clip renal hypertension and cardiovascular hypertrophy. Biol Pharm Bull 1995 Sep;18(9):1283-5. 1995. PMID:11760.

5McCabe, Laura, et al. “Probiotic use decreases intestinal inflammation and increases bone density in healthy male but not female mice.” Journal of Cellular Physiology. DOI: 10.1002/jcp.24340. Web. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcp.24340/abstract

6Meyer, AL, et al. “Probiotic, as well as conventional yogurt, can enhance the stimulated production of proinflammatory cytokines.” Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 2007 Dec;20(6):590-8.Web. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18001380

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51 comments. Leave Yours Now →
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    I am on arimidex following treatment for breast cancer. My last dexa noted a decrease of -12.7%. I have been advised that if I intend to continue with the arimidex I should start taking strontium again which I took 6 yrs ago. I have been taking TrueOsteo for the past 6-9 months. I am not keen on taking the strontium as I note that there is a 1-10 chance of a CVD incidence. and blood clots etc. There seems to be some additional information now available regarding strontium which was not around when I took it previously. Any advice please.

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  8. Robert Robertson July 21, 2015, 8:10 pm

    Dear Vivian, please excuse my ignorance but I thought that calcium was absorbed from the gut as a divalent cation. Are you suggesting that the metabolism of organic calcium (whatever that may be – a reference to a credible scientific article could be useful at this point) differs from the divalent cation derived from calcium carbonate or the calcium in cow’s milk. Incidentally, there is a notable absence of scientific evidence to support the acid ash hypothesis of osteoporosis. Do I detect the whiff of snake oil on your website?

  9. Andrea March 30, 2015, 9:48 am

    Hi Vivian,
    I have been following your program for a couple of years now and have purchased your cook book and exercise book. I’ve also been ordering TrueOsteo as you recommend here. You have taught us to question what the medical establishment and big pharma preach and to think for ourselves–which is all good! But today in the news, there is, once again an article on the oversight (or lack thereof) of dietary supplements. Many have been found to contain harmful substances that are not listed in the ingredients and to not include ingredients that are listed. How can we find out what TrueOsteo and its branded ingredient AlgaeCal really contain? Has there been any government or second party testing of it? If we have learned our lesson well from you it is to question all advice and products that are recommended to us no matter how trustworthy-seeming the source. Even you. Thanks very much. I have appreciated all of the information and encouragement you have shared with us.
    Andrea
    March 30, 2015

    • Andrea March 31, 2015, 9:16 pm

      Hi,
      I’m really hoping you can address my question about TrueOsteo. I see that there have been other questions as well. Thanks very much.

      • Customer Support April 1, 2015, 5:35 pm

        It’s good to ask questions, Andrea! For details about TrueOsteo, your best bet is to contact the manufacturers directly at this link:

        http://www.naturecity.com/contact-us.php?

        • Andrea April 4, 2015, 8:38 am

          Here is my response from NatureCity:

          “Thank you for inquiring about our TrueOsteo product. The main ingredient used in TrueOsteo is AlgaeCal®, the makers test it thoroughly for their Certificate of Analysis. Our manufacturer Vitaquest International does testing in their labs also for ingredient accuracy.”

  10. Mary Anne Henry January 18, 2015, 1:37 pm

    Hi Vivienne,

    I have been diagnosed with severe osteoporosis in my spine (and am only 57) and Hashimotos disease and have been taking TrueOsteo, but have been doing much research about the idea that osteoporosis is an autoimmune disease so I am following the autoimmune/paleo protocol to eliminate gluten and inflammatory foods and/or those that can contribute to leaky gut (and Hashimotos). I notice that TrueOsteo contains rice flour, and rice is not allowed on the autoimmune/gluten free diet. I have stopped taking TrueOsteo and wonder if you can recommend something else that is more definitively gluten-free or comment on this issue? Or wonder if the manufacturers would consider producing a more autoimmune friendly product??

    Thank you,
    Mary Anne Henry

  11. Sola Somade October 22, 2014, 10:29 pm

    I am a visitor to the US. I will like to purchase AlgaeCal or True Osteo, can you tell me in which stores I can find these products. I cannot buy on line.

    • carmen December 5, 2014, 10:51 pm

      Cananybody in the community tell me if true Osteo can be safely taken by a person who is on aspirin and plavix. I take a daily baby aspirin and Plavix 1 every other day.
      These are anti clotting agents and True Osteo has vitamin K which is a clotting agent.

  12. Nadia September 4, 2014, 10:27 am

    I have underactive thyroid, the Dr never mention that broccoli or any other food and calcium pills is bad for me , I am very surprised when I read other people comment and advise it is really very good way to know more since my Dr never told me anything except hi we will get some blood and that’s it she walk out.
    I got your original book and the last one with a lot of delicious meals, thank you for all your effort and advise if you can tell me what food should I avoid and if I should avoid calcium pills?????

  13. Leslie (Ms. L. Carmel) August 31, 2014, 7:00 pm

    Good Day Vivian And Saveourbones Commenters,

    I Eat 4 Out Of 5 Of The Calcium-Rich Alkalizing Foods, Except Kale. I’m Not Too Fond Of Kale. But Maybe I’ll Try It Once In A While.

    I Thank All Of You For You Input. It Is Very Helpful, And I Appreciate It Very Much.

    Until Next Time-Take Care Everyone, And Stay Well.

    LOVE, LESLIE (MS. L. CARMEL)

    • NADIA September 4, 2014, 10:02 am

      I did hate kale but I have a way of preparing it , you will like it.
      Cut red onion very fine put some salt on the onion and smash it with your hand 3 or 4 times .Cut kale very fine in same plate and add cut tomatoes, radish, feta cheese
      cranberry , walnut and add salt oil and lemon as you wish, enjoy it.

      • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA September 4, 2014, 10:45 am

        Thank you, Nadia! That sounds delicious. 🙂

  14. Nancy Clarke August 30, 2014, 11:25 pm

    I have been taking AlgaeCal which you reccommened since buying your book Save Our Bones about 3 to 4 years ago and recently tried Truosteo/6 months supply .I have had a bone density test and found I have lost more bone density so have gone back to AlgaeCal as this is a better balance of Calcium/Magnesium ratio .I do pick up a lot of good advice from your program which I am sure helps me as I am 80 yr old and keep good health thank you Nancy . Reply

  15. Sauda Barwani August 30, 2014, 5:46 am

    Hi,
    I buy my culcium in England from Holland&Barrett health food store.It is from oyster shell.My dentist practice chineese medicine and he tested it and said is very good.May those people who live in the U.K can try this .
    Sauda

  16. Thom Osborn August 29, 2014, 4:52 pm

    I am a devoted follower of yours, with regard to both food
    and exercise. However, with food: sometimes a clash with an existing condition. Thus: I have a tendency to form kidney stones – containing calcium oxalate. So two food items, both of of which I am very fond, clash here: almonds, and sesame. I continue to eat a lot of almonds and almond butter – but have steered clear of hummus. My kidney consultant says if I drink plenty of water I should be alright, even with a small piece of dark chocolate in the morning! ( – everything I buy and eat at home is organic – not totally fussy when out with friends!) ( – and my last kidney stone episode was over three years ago, easily treated with sound bombardment – but – …). My general point is the question – is there any principle in dealing with such clashes? Is it right just to take a balanced approach – as with the alkalising/acidifying ratio right at about 80/20 %? Or do you have some additional wise words on this issue? Or
    any specific advice with specific foods?

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 31, 2014, 5:58 pm

      Thom, if you’ve had kidney stones in the past, the oxalate content of foods can be a concern. If you are not comfortable eating foods with a high oxalate content, no worries – there are plenty of others to choose from! 🙂

  17. Marlene Villar August 29, 2014, 1:07 pm

    Good morning Vivian,
    I’m very grateful for receiving excellent information
    on different topics. I’m learning from it, evaluating and
    listening to my body, and applying it accordingly to reverse my bone loss naturally. Thank you very much
    Vivian and the rests of your team for your mission to
    help all of us. I continue sharing your website.
    May HE bless you abundantly. Have a wonderful day
    and take care always. Marlene

  18. Richard August 28, 2014, 11:37 pm

    The information on the amount of calcium is inconsistent with some other sites which claim only 21mg in raw broccoli but the primary point is it is very difficult to get 1200mg of calcium daily from vegetables. A serving of sardines on the other hand has over 300mg.
    I can not recommend dairy for stronger bones and maybe the body needs less calcium if not consuming dairy but getting enough D3 and K2.
    Fact is that like almost every area of nutrition, more research is needed. Our government has not only failed us for many decades but has even mis-guided us because of their propensity to support industry rather than good health.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 29, 2014, 8:11 am

      Yes, it does depend on which source you look at, Richard – and it underscores the point about growing conditions and preparation methods affecting calcium content. Different labs test different batches of foods grown in different areas, so the calcium level results from the tests are definitely going to vary! 🙂

  19. Shahnaz August 28, 2014, 11:20 pm

    Hi
    I couldn’t understand how come cooked vegetables (kale,broccoli etc) have more calcium than raw? I thought raw veggies have more calcium and we can destroy some by cooking. Could it be an error? Or I am reading wrong?

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 29, 2014, 8:09 am

      You’re reading correctly, Shahnaz! While the mechanism is not entirely understood, calcium is not the only nutrient that is made more bioavailable with cooking. Antioxidants also increase when some foods are cooked – according to a study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, this increase is “…probably because of matrix softening and increased extractability of compounds, which could be partially converted into more antioxidant chemical species.” You can read more of the study here:

      http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf072304b?prevSearch=boiling+frying+steaming&searchHistoryKey=

  20. Elizabeth August 28, 2014, 3:17 pm

    I’ve made a note of the calcium rich foods and am eating a lot of them already. I’m not sure about taking calcium supplements, since I was a patient in the Renal Unit, and was put on calcium supplements to protect my bones while on steroids. The Renal Consultant looked at my blood test results and said that the calcium was doing my bones no good at all (I think high levels of calcium were circulating in my blood) I don’t know if this is down to the chronic kidney disease. But as I am unable to take calcium, I include a lot of calcium rich foods in my diet and hope that this, along with cod liver oil each day will help my bones, as I was diagnosed with osteoporosis in 2012. I do a lot of weight bearing exercises too. I am going for another DEXA scan next week, so hope for an improvement.

  21. Elsie August 28, 2014, 2:48 pm

    Thanks for good info which we cand incoporate in our health regimen.
    I have been using Life Extension, Bone Assure /Bone Restore and Vitamin D3, When Marine D3 came out I use it also,. for more than a year now, and I also Use Oceans Alive and now Oceans Alive .2 I don’t know if you know this products but tey are from the Ocean and came Algae also, The Oceans ALive is not too good smell but if I use it Melaleuca Active Immune C , taste good. Think of trying your recommendation. or adding to it. I am a Life Extension Member since early 90’s Thanks again!

  22. shula August 28, 2014, 2:32 pm

    What about bok choy, cabbage, and chard?

  23. Rita August 28, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Dear Vivian,

    May I also join the chorus singing your praises from the UK.
    I too would very much like to get a regular shipment of “True Osteo” sent via a British company. Many more pensioners with Osteopenia would then be enabled to avoid the Biphosphonate prescriptions provided by the NHS. A reliable company, like ” Agora Health Limited”, could be approached.

    • lu September 1, 2014, 3:30 pm

      I hope the true osteo works for you it did not for me and I took it for almost 2 years.

      No improvement whatsoever. Didn’t even keep condition from getting worse.

  24. janet lasser August 28, 2014, 10:45 am

    Dear Vivian,
    Thanks so much for your amazing information.
    Wondering if you would reply to Sherry Millers question regarding the dosage of Tru Osteo as it relates to raising blood pressure. What is this relationship and how does this work. Her post is concerning to me and i want to be able to take the right amount of my Tru Osteo supplement. Thank you so much!

  25. Carol August 28, 2014, 10:11 am

    I have called and contacted your Save Our Bones company numerous times about the compatibility of iMac and other Mac computers. They told to email my question to the Customer Service for the response. I emailed them numerous times and never received any response at all. What is the excuse?

    August 26, 2014, 6:32 pm
    Are your Densercise both in eBook Manual and Online Video Collection compatible with all units of MAC computers for download: iMac Desktop, iPad, iPhone, Mac Airbook, etc? Or just for PC users only? Many companies are compatible both Mac and PC, not just for PC only.

    • Shahnaz August 28, 2014, 11:26 pm

      I have “densercise” in my iPad and laptop both. I hope that helps. And I always contact “save out bones” customer service and they respond very promptly. I never had any problem.

      • Carol August 29, 2014, 12:43 pm

        Thanks for your comment. What model of laptop and what year do you have?
        Mine is iMac which has very advanced technology started in late 2013. I have latest version of Adobe Reader and hope it will download smoothly.

    • Customer Support August 28, 2014, 2:17 pm

      Hi Carol,
      Please check your inbox for an e-mail from our Customer Support. 🙂

  26. Bettie August 28, 2014, 9:31 am

    Vivian,
    There are a lot of alkalizing foods out there that you recommend such as broccoli, kale etc., but I have a thyroid problem and they ask that I not eat a lot of these. If cooked they do not have as bad of an effect on your thyroid. Do you have any suggestions? I would appreciate hearing from you. If you have osteoporosis and Hashimotos Disease it causes a conflict in a lot of things. Thanks for your help

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 28, 2014, 10:11 am

      Hi Bettie,

      I understand your concerns about your thyroid. 🙂 That’s why I wrote this in the segment on broccoli:

      “Many Savers have concerns about thyroid health, and have been warned not to eat cruciferous vegetables. If this is a concern for you, please don’t worry! There are many other foods to choose from on the Save Our Bones Program, so you can still build stronger, younger bones through your diet.” 🙂

  27. Sherrie Miller August 28, 2014, 9:15 am

    Dear Vivian,
    I commented on another email that I just replied to you regarding my BP going over 220/100 many times after I increased this True Osteo Bone supplement to 4 pills/day and also increasing my calcium intake of foods that I was eating.
    I was OK by taking 3 pills/day, but I was also not eating as much calcium foods. When I increased my intake of calcium rich foods and also increased my pill to 4/day, my blood pressure went off the chart and I ended up in the ER 4 times in 1 week, till a doctor at the Cleveland Clinic gave me Calcium Channel Blockers to block the calcium from getting to my heart.
    I think the dosage is too high from these calcium pills if you are eating calcium rich foods. I think the dosage should be cut down to 1 or 2 pills/day. However, I stopped them entirely and my BP has returned to normal.
    I will also add, My sister-in-law was taking coral calcium pills and when I told her what happened to me, she said her BP also went up to over 140 ever since she started her calcium pills and she didn’t know why because it was also around 120 before…so she is also going off her coral-calcium pills. Please spread the word about calcium pills!!!!

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 28, 2014, 2:22 pm

      I am so glad you’ve gotten your blood pressure normalized, Sherrie! Your story is a perfect example of why we all need to be aware of our own individual health and our bodies. You figured out what works and does not work for you, and made adjustments accordingly. Good for you!

  28. illya August 28, 2014, 7:08 am

    Very good information but not for everyone I think. Myself I am not allowed to have any supplements like calcium. With my thyroid I lost a lot
    of bones and a lot of weight. I am 1.67 and my weight is now 44 kilo. This is a worry. Also I got other problems with this now. Maybe Vivian could help me somehow please. I am not on any medicines and never have been. Thank for the information Vivian, well done. Kindest regards, Illya

    • Bettie August 28, 2014, 9:34 am

      I have Hashimotos Disease (hypothyroid w/autoimmune) but I don’t have any trouble taking the TrueOsteo Calcium. Does it cause you a problem with your thyroid levels? My TSH stays down to 0.27 and that is where I feel the best. I take 2 kinds of thyroid medicine. One for T3 and one for T4. I sure hope you can get help with your problem.

  29. Betty August 28, 2014, 6:47 am

    Good morning and thanks for all the amazing information I am reading today. Oxalates have become more of a concern to me recently because my husband was just found to have kidney stones. His “go to” snack has been nuts for over 50 years of marriage so it will be interesting to find out (if we do) whether they are from calcium supplements or from oxalates. Even for myself I have been aware of the oxalate containing green foods. I guess “all things in moderation” is a good principle.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 28, 2014, 10:06 am

      Yes, that is a very good principle, Betty, along with “all things in balance.” 🙂

  30. Elaine August 28, 2014, 5:57 am

    Thanks so much for this helpful information. My concern with almonds and sesame seeds is that they are high oxalate foods. I understand that oxalates bind to minerals like calcium and magnesium so you don’t get all the nutrition that you think you do. They inhibit the absorption of calcium actually. I ‘m sure you get some, but the oxalates are a concern. Does this concur with your research?

    Thank you, Elaine

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 28, 2014, 10:05 am

      Hi Elaine,

      I know that some laboratory studies have indicated that oxalates may interfere with calcium absorption. But the reduction is relatively small and should not prevent you from eating these healthful foods, which contain many valuable nutrients! 🙂

  31. Lowana August 28, 2014, 5:31 am

    TrueOsteo sounds great but the postage to Australia is almost the same as one bottle of TreuOsteo..isn’t there a cheaper way to send it please”

    • cathy August 28, 2014, 10:48 am

      Hi Lowana, I also would like to take TrueOsteo its just as expensive to ship to England, and as far as I understand there is the import duty as well. What we need is a buying address from our own countries where it could easily be shipped from and for a fraction of the cost, I am sure there would be lots of customers. So instead I avidly read all of Vivian’s emails to understand how to obtain the most calcium from the food that we eat. A massive Thank you Vivian in keeping us so well informed. cathy

      • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 28, 2014, 2:10 pm

        You are welcome, Cathy! As more people learn about TrueOsteo, maybe the manufacturers will look into international distributors. 🙂

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