Today’s exercise corrects and prevents Forward Head Posture (FHP) and anterior pelvic tilt. This detrimental and often painful posture combo gives an exaggerated S-shape when observed from profile, causing compromised balance and many other problems, including an increased risk of compression fractures.

The FHP And Pelvic Tilt Corrector is a simple but powerful isometric exercise that corrects both FHP and anterior pelvic tilt.

And let me tell you, I was surprised when I tried this exercise! The movement is very subtle, and at first, it looks like you’re not doing much of anything. But when I actually did it, I could really feel “the burn” in my neck, back, and core muscles.

So I can’t wait to share it with you today!

Why: Savers are familiar with FHP, the forward position of the head that is associated with kyphosis (Dowager’s Hump). Anterior pelvic tilt can happen when the head is thrust forward in this awkward way, making the abdominals weak. Weakened abdominals do not hold the lower back in the proper position, allowing it to sag forward (think of a “sway-back”). The pelvis subsequently tilts forward like a tipped bowl.

The Awful Problems Associated With FHP And Anterior Pelvic Tilt

As mentioned earlier, these conditions are not only unsightly; they can also be quite painful. In addition, when your body weight is distributed awkwardly due to spinal misalignment, your vertebrae have to take the weight in all the wrong places. This sets you up for painful compression fractures.

When the compressive load on the spine’s lumbar arch structure is unnaturally increased, the stage is set for disc degeneration and height loss as well.

Anterior Pelvic Tilt results in compromised balance as your body instinctively compromises for the off-center pelvic position. This, of course, offsets your balance severely.

FHP carries a host of health problems as well, including the disruption of necessary communication between the brain, spinal cord, and body. FHP causes balance problems that make you more prone to falling and sustaining a fracture, and sets your cervical vertebrae up for degeneration. Breathing problems, rib dysfunction (which affects breathing), and headaches also go along with FHP.

But these problems are preventable and reversible. Today’s exercise is a perfect example of how you can flatten your back and strengthen key muscle groups that hold your lumbar and thoracic spine in alignment. And it feels amazing!

Here’s how to do it.

How: The FHP And Pelvic Tilt Corrector is done standing up. All you need is a weight, preferably one with a handle. I use a laundry detergent bottle, and it worked great.

Make sure you don’t try this exercise at first with too much weight, so start with a lighter weight and adjust the weight based on your comfort level:

  1. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart. Keep a slight bend in your knees.
  2. Pick up the weight (or laundry detergent bottle) and bring it up over your head and behind your shoulder and let it pull your arm downward close to your ear and toward the floor. Your elbow should be pointing at the ceiling.
  3. Pull your navel in toward your spine and lift your chest slightly. Make sure your chin is tucked-in and your neck aligned with your spine.
  4. Tuck your pelvis inward slightly (think of the pelvis as a bowl that is tipping behind you instead of in front, as in the anterior tilt).
  5. Lean back very slightly at the hips (do not lean back by bending your back).
  6. You will know your lower back is in the right position when you feel your abdominal and core muscles working.
  7. Hold for 20 seconds, or as long as you comfortably can. Switch arms and repeat.
  8. Do this exercise up to 3 or 4 times a day to keep your spine in alignment.

Tips:

  • Keep your knees supple; do not lock them.
  • Do not try to hold the weight in the middle of your back unless you use a kettle bell or something similar. If you have the weight in your right hand, the weight will hang behind your right shoulder blade.
  • When in doubt, go with a lighter weight. A full bottle of detergent might be too much.

This is an excellent exercise to incorporate into your regular routine. I like to follow The FHP And Pelvic Tilt Corrector with The Forward Shoulder Corrector. That way, I am targeting both the upper and lower back to preserve youthful spinal alignment.
In fact, I like to target as many aspects of osteoporosis as possible, because…

Osteoporosis Is A Multifaceted Condition

It’s important to understand that osteoporosis is about more than just bone density. To effectively tackle it, you need to take various approaches and “attack” from as many angles as you can.

My goal is to arm you with as many “weapons” as possible, including nutrition, a positive attitude, and targeted exercise. And the inspiring thing is, these weapons are highly effective. Thousands of Savers have succeeded and come out victorious in their fight against osteoporosis, and so can you.

Exercise Is Vital In The Fight For Younger Bones

The truth is, there is just no way to correct poor posture without exercise. With the Densercise™ Epidensity Training System, you’ll engage in postural, weight-bearing, and resistance exercises (once again, covering all the bases!) that will strengthen your muscles and help you achieve a youthful posture and increase your bone density.

The Weekend Challenges are a great way to add a variety of moves that help you reverse osteoporosis, and they fit in perfectly with Densercise™, which takes just 15 minutes a day, 3 days a week.

It’s time to stand tall and overcome osteoporosis! And with exercises like this one and the ones in Densercise™, you can be victorious.

Have a great weekend!

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27 comments. Leave Yours Now →
  1. Muhammad December 4, 2015, 10:50 am

    Barry:I doubt there would be any problems with the paint being epoesxd to the Basileum vapors, especially after being pressure washed twice. The larger issue is what the paint itself might contain. It’s possible that the original paint could contain heavy metals such as lead or cadmium. As I mentioned in an earlier reply in this post, has been recommended by other builders as an encapsulating paint.Personally, I’m not too worried about lead or other metals in my paint. As long as the paint is in good condition and not peeling, there’s very little harm it can cause. I’m old enough that I grew up with lead paint all around me I just didn’t eat any of it. I would definitely not recommend sanding it without a respirator on, but otherwise there’s just no obvious route for exposure. All of my interior container metal will be covered with either spray foam insulation or a coat of regular paint.Steve

  2. Louise OSGOOD December 14, 2014, 4:05 pm

    It seems to me that you are preaching against Christine Kent R.N.. Thinking of the pelvic bowl instead of the wall and against the S curve…
    Why,when she gave you access to her clients? I am still reading you…don’t stop that but tell me why the excercise that work against the S-curve? MS OSGOOD

  3. joy markman November 15, 2014, 12:21 pm

    Hi Vivian, they are offering a new scan now which is much cheaper then the Dexa Scan. It is called the Non-invasive ultrasound, BeamMed. What is your opinion on this?
    Please have one of your helpers answer my question please Vivian.

  4. Leslie (Ms. L. Carmel) November 13, 2014, 11:44 am

    Good Afternoon Vivian And Fellow Commenters,

    Thank You All Very Much, For All Your Valuable Input. It Really Means A Lot To Me!

    Also I Agree With Pat Nelson – If You Showed Actual Photos Of The Exercises, It Would Be A Lot More Helpful.

    Thank You All Again For All You Do!

    LOVE, LESLIE (MS. L. CARMEL)

  5. Laila November 11, 2014, 9:14 am

    Vivian , what a wonderful service you provide,the exercises are clear and easy to follow.
    keep the good work
    God bless you
    Laila from London

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 12, 2014, 1:10 pm

      Thanks so much, Laila! Let us know how the exercise goes. 🙂

  6. Barbara Mundy November 11, 2014, 2:05 am

    I wish to take advantage of your 7 year.Anniversary offer but do not have the internet to download all the digital material. Is the package available in hard copy? I am in Australia & accept to pay postage. Can I contact you by phone? What is your international number? I thank you for all the advice I have received from your emails, but would love the full program.

    • Customer Support November 11, 2014, 12:24 pm

      Hi Barbara,
      Please check your e-mail for a message from our Customer Service department! We’ll be glad to help explain things and help you out. 🙂

  7. Jean November 10, 2014, 10:47 am

    I really need an answer to this question, although I’m not sure this is the proper place to ask it. Nine years ago I had surgery for breast cancer, a lumpectomy followed by radiation. My radiation oncologist “graduated” me 4 years ago. My medical oncologist would have “graduated” me next October, and then there came a glitch. A recent hospitalization for a bladder/kidney infection which went dangerously septic revealed cancer in my spine – totally unexpected. My oncologist is treating the CA with Femara, which I had taken for five years after surgery. However, she would like me to agree to infusions of Xgeva to guard against fractures. She has treated many patients this way, with good results. I told her no, but I’d consider it. I was diagnosed with osteoporosis in Sept 2005, and prescribed Actonel, which I took for two years and two months. It did nothing to improve my bone density, so I found and joined the S O B program sometime later. Subsequent Dexa scans again showed no improvement, but I was hoping to have another dexa scan when I had my annual checkup in November. However, the above situation got in the way. My question: I’d like to know what Vivian thinks of this. I’m inclined just to continue with S O B, take the Femara, and do the best I can. But this is a situation different from the usual osteoporosis diagnosis, and I’m pretty sure it won’t be the last time this question comes up. (And maybe not the first.) I have a lot of respect for my oncologist.

    • Linda November 12, 2014, 11:32 am

      Hi Jean, I am so sorry to hear of your trouble with cancer in the spine. I wish there was something I could say or do for you. I know your agony and that you wish someone would tell you what to do. I have noticed that on this site they do not like to give any medical instruction . I am sure it is because of law suit issues. I just didnt want you to feel ignored. You are in my prayers.

      • jean November 17, 2014, 8:36 am

        Thanks Linda, I’m happy to feel less ignored!

        • Jean November 17, 2014, 7:39 pm

          Of course, they would have no way of knowing that I’m not the kind of person who’s likely to initiate a law suit; I’d just like to know what Vivian’s take on the matter might be; doesn’t necessarily mean I’d take her advice anyway, although I’m not inclined at this point to agree to the Xgeva. I’m not sure there’s much to be gained by adding yet more side effects! Thanks for the prayers!

  8. Annabelle November 10, 2014, 3:21 am

    Excellent info! Your support is invaluable. Thank you for your encouragement.

  9. pegge November 10, 2014, 1:52 am

    Thanks so much! I always look forward to your emails & was just wondering if Densercise is the same as Densercise Epidensity Training system. So thankful for these exercises to strengthen my back.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 10, 2014, 1:32 pm

      Yes Pegge, when we say “Densercise” we are referring to the Densercise Epidensity Training System. 🙂

  10. Naomi "Noni" Mayer November 8, 2014, 9:18 pm

    Thanks Vivian for all your help. My bone density scan came up this time. Diet, weight bearing exercise & supplement of calcium from algea has helped a lot. Thanks for all your good info over the last 5 years.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 10, 2014, 1:30 pm

      I am so glad to hear that, Naomi!

  11. B November 8, 2014, 7:24 pm

    What exercises help pelvic prolapse.

  12. Pat Nelson November 8, 2014, 2:32 pm

    These exercises would be a lot more helpful if you showed pictures (either drawn or actually photos) of the posses. It is often difficult to picture whether or not I am doing them right. A picture is worth a thousand words.

  13. Andrea November 8, 2014, 1:46 pm

    I just thank you ever so much, Vivian, for all your great information, beneficial exercises and being there for all of us. Your Internet site offers valuable support.
    Best wishes for your continued success,
    Andrea

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 10, 2014, 1:29 pm

      You are very welcome, Andrea. 🙂

  14. Monica Wald November 8, 2014, 11:05 am

    Good info……….just when I needed it.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 8, 2014, 2:23 pm

      I am glad this is timely for you, Monica!

      • Florence November 8, 2014, 2:43 pm

        These exercises are difficult to do by yourself. If you can have a roommate or friend read them to you while you do them it would be more doable. Anyway, when I have a friend come over I will try it.

  15. elizabeth November 8, 2014, 5:08 am

    Hi there I try to do your your workouts is it safe with three fractures I. My back thanks

    • Shaaron November 9, 2014, 3:09 pm

      I too would like to know what exercises are safe to do with pelvis prolapse.

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