The Truth About Tymlos (Abaloparatide), The Newest Osteoporosis Drug

Big Pharma continues to introduce new osteoporosis drugs onto the market, even as more people are questioning their safety and choosing healthier lifestyle-based interventions to reduce fracture risk.

The latest osteoporosis drug on the market manufactured by Radius Health is abaloparatide, sold under the brand name Tymlos, a daily injectable drug that the Save Institute has been monitoring throughout its development.

Today we’ll show you what this drug is all about, its mechanism of action, its side effects, and more.

What Is Abaloparatide?

Abaloparatide is a synthetic sequence of amino acids designed to serve as an analog for human parathyroid hormone-related peptide (hPTHrP). This peptide stimulates osteoblasts to increase bone synthesis. That makes it different from the older osteoporosis drugs, bisphosphonates, that increase bone density by blocking osteoclasts that remove old bone.

A once-daily subcutaneous injection, abaloparatide is not recommended to be used for longer than two years, due to the risk of osteosarcoma or bone cancer (more on that later.)1

Synopsis

Abaloparatide is a laboratory-made anabolic protein mimicking naturally-occurring peptides that activate osteoblasts to increase bone formation.

Tymlos And Forteo

Tymlos is not the first drug of its kind. It activates the same parathyroid hormone pathways as Forteo (teriparatide), and thus functions in the same way. The key difference is that while Forteo is a recombinant human parathyroid hormone analog, Tymlos is a human parathyroid hormone-related peptide analog.

The recommended use of Tymlos is narrower than Forteo. Tymlos is generally only recommended in high-fracture risk cases with a history of osteoporotic fracture, or in which patients don’t respond to other osteoporosis drugs. Unlike Forteo, Tymlos is only recommended for women.2

It also has many of the same side effects as Forteo.

Synopsis

Tymlos functions in the same way as Forteo (teriparatide), by activating parathyroid hormone pathways. That means they have the same end result and many of the same risks.

A Close Look At The Fine Print

The clinical trials of Tymlos also revealed a slate of side effects and dangers associated with the drug.

The most alarming and serious risk is osteosarcoma, a form of bone cancer. Animal studies of abaloparatide revealed that the drug causes a dose-dependent increase in the incidence of osteosarcoma. The same is true of Forteo. As a result, neither drug is prescribed for more than two years, but the risk of osteosarcoma is acknowledged regardless of the length of use.3

Tymlos is not recommended for people already at risk of osteosarcoma due to Paget’s disease of bone or unexplained elevations of alkaline phosphatase, open epiphyses, bone metastases or skeletal malignancies, hereditary disorders predisposing to osteosarcoma, or certain radiation therapies.2

While bone cancer is the most dire potential side effect, it’s not the only one. Other side effects include:

  • Hypercalciuria
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Palpitations and fast heartbeat
  • Fatigue
  • Abdominal Pain
  • Vertigo
  • Painful urination and blood in the urine

Once the prescribed course of Tymlos is completed, the manufacturers of Tymlos recommend taking alendronate (a bisphosphonate you may know as Fosamax) to maintain the newly accumulated bone.2 Alendronate comes with its own slew of different risks and side effects. That means that taking Tymlos results in needing to take more drugs.

It’s relevant to note that this year, the European Medicines Agency has rejected abaloparatide, stating that the drug’s benefits do not outweigh its risks.

Clearly, drugs are not a solution for osteoporosis.

Synopsis

Tymlos may cause osteosarcoma (bone cancer), as well as a host of other side effects.

Tymlos: One More Osteoporosis Drug You Should Avoid

Medications like Forteo and Tymlos promise to reverse osteoporosis, but their results are questionable, and many of their side effects extremely dangerous.

At the Save Institute, we maintain that the risks of osteoporosis drugs, including Tymlos, greatly exceed their questionable potential benefits. So we recommend staying away from osteoporosis drugs, and considering a natural, safe and effective osteoporosis reversal protocol.

References

1 “Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of BA058 (Abaloparatide) for Prevention of Fracture in Postmenopausal Women.” Clinical Trial Results. Web: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01343004?sect=X0123456

2 Tymlos Prescribing Information. Radius Pharmaceuticals. Web. http://radiuspharm.com/wp-content/uploads/tymlos/tymlos-prescribing-information.pdf

3 Vahle JL. “Bone neoplasms in F344 rats given teriparatide [rhPTH(1-34)] are dependent on duration of treatment and dose.” Toxicol Pathol. 2004 Jul-Aug;32(4):426-38. Web. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15204966

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22 comments. Leave Yours Now →
  1. Maggie Pink September 30, 2018, 10:40 am

    Dear Vivien,

    I was talked into having a biphosphate infusion in August from my local osteoporosis nurse specialist as a recent scan showed that osteopenia had developed into osteoporosis of the spine. I have felt so poorly since having it with so many aches and pains in my bones and jaw. I definitely won’t continue with the yearly infusion but I wondered if the drug will eventually leave my system? Also could you give me any advice to try to speed up the process of it leaving my system please? I really wish I had not agreed to this infusion,

    With thanks in advance for any advice you may be able to offer.

    Regards

    Maggie Pink

  2. Brenda McKee September 13, 2018, 10:17 am

    I have the SAVE OUR BONES 2008-2011 version. Does the new book have any material I need to know?

  3. Dorothy Jenson September 1, 2018, 7:36 pm

    I fast one day per week – Saturday. Is fasting bad for bone health. I eat healthy otherwise. Also I take True Osteo. I took Prolia for about one and a half years but took myself off of it. bones were really bad after that but seem to be getting better.
    They seem rickety in the morning but limber up as the day progresses. I am 89 yrs
    old. Any advice would be appreciated. Dorothy

  4. carole bold August 23, 2018, 8:54 am

    Hi my Doctor suggested I go on Forteo after reading up on it I’m scared to death of the bone cancer issue. I read about vitamin K2 that sends the calcium to your bones instead of in the bloodstream But he said eat green vegetables no problem for me I love vegetables But my concern is my body is not absorbing the calcium as it should Wondering if anyone tried the Vitamin K2 or has any information about it
    Thank you so much

    • MARIE MARKOVICH August 27, 2018, 3:40 am

      Carole….in 2016 I had a cordizone shot that was done wrong by Rainer Orthopedic institute which caused paralysis and severe back pain that was over the top.My lumbar discs were damaged and slipped. June 2018 no choice but to do lumbar fusion.
      Besides the wonderful save our bones sometimes our damaged bodies don’t absorb well. I was told take Vit D, magnesium and Vit K with my plant based calcium. Of course the bone Doctor tells me I will be crippled if I dont take Forteo. I saw my friend die if bone cancer.I will take my chances on Vit therapy,lots is walking and core strength exercises

  5. Kelsey Fickling August 22, 2018, 11:46 pm

    Thanks again Vivian for your invaluable advice. I’ve been a “saver” many years and at 87 years old in November I’ve really benefitted from following your great program. My chemist told me when I had my first Bone Density Scan that Fosamax (by Merck) was at that time going through Court in USA for users of that drug having suffered many serious side effects. I was 75 years old – when my Chemist warned me about it I decided to Google osteoporoses – causes and what to do about a diagnosis . With the help of another doctor I began to add some supplements to my diet and I found your website – I’m not sure when – but I’m glad I did. The same thing happened with my blood pressure – for many, many years my blood pressure was 150/60. I was asked about 22 years ago to be part of a 6 weeks trial for Blood Pressure. I had my blood pressure taken at the doctor’s rooms for 6 weeks Monday to Saturday and several months later I was advised that blood pressure over 140/60 was requiring medication. Noten was my new medication. My brother told me he had taken Noten for many years and eventually he needed a Pacemaker. I had an appointment with his Cardiologist who told me my brother had a serious irregular heartbeat and it was fine for me to continue taking it. My GP about 6 years ago decided to change my blood pressure medication – she gave me Coversyl and first night I had severe palpitations – phoned the rooms next day – changed me to Atacand with half a 50mg Noten. Two years ago I was to have a colonoscopy (my sister had bowel cancer – and we were advised the siblings should have a colonoscopy ) – because of my age the doctor decided I should see the Anaesthetist first – an irregular heartbeat was detected. Off I go to the same Cardiologist – after doing all the “machines” he told me my irregular heartbeat was not requiring attention. One year later I receive a letter from the Cardiologist’s with an appointment for a review – I did that; and he took away the Noten and replaced it with Sotolol ? Taken twice daily – on an empty stomach and Dairy and mineral supplements at least 2 to 3 hours away from the dose. He did not bother to talk to me about it – my blood pressure went really high195/90 on and off – after a couple of months I spoke to my GP and he suggested I speak to the Cardiologist – I phoned and spoke to his nurse – she phoned me back after speaking with him and told me to stop the new meds and go back to the Noten. I did and I’m almost feeling well as I was prior to the change. Sorry for the long letter but I’ve realised I probably never needed medication in the first place. Blessings, Kelsey (Australia).

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 24, 2018, 4:32 pm

      Wow, Kelsey – what an adventure you’ve had with the blood pressure drugs! Thankfully, you’ve avoided osteoporosis drugs, and are practicing a bone-healthy lifestyle. 🙂

  6. Jan Fisher August 22, 2018, 7:50 pm

    Very helpful to read the comments of others.

  7. Corinne Stern August 22, 2018, 3:38 pm

    I would like as much information on alternative ways to deal with osteoporosis. I stopped Fosomax a long time ago. How can I get Vivisn’s book?

    • Save Institute Customer Support August 22, 2018, 9:11 pm

      Thanks for your interest, Corinne! If you’d like to get the Save Our Bones Program, just click on Shop above and then click on the Save Our Bones Program thumbnail. 🙂 Please let us know if you have any questions by sending an e-mail to Customer Support at support@saveourbones.com.

  8. Judith Gilbert August 22, 2018, 2:08 pm

    Dear Vivian,

    I am now almost 83 years old. When I was 47 (!!) I was prescribed Fosamax, (then, I think,it was a fairly new product) by my gynecologist; he said that this was necessary because I am tall , very thin and “spider-boned”, I took it, at great expense–( there was no generic), for about 3 years until an Asian periodontist advised me that he would give me no treatment unless I stopped taking Fosamax for 6 months. He explained why, and unnerved me so much that I stopped taking Fosamax immediately. Shortly thereafter, a writer friend of mine put me on to Vivian, 2 of whose books I own, and whose advice I have followed to the letter, ever since! This was, clearly, many years ago, and I have suffered not a single fracture. My husband and I keep “alkaline guts”, exercise and take no drugs.

    My diagnosis had been, according to “Dexa”, severe osteoporosis of the left hip, and osteopoenia in the right one. Some years later, a long time after having stopped taking Fosamax, ( or any other drug, for that matter) I had another Dexa examination, and was told that there was a” marked improvement” in my bone density. I said nothing about having stopped taking it a long time ago—perhaps I should have—because I suppose that she assumed, at the time, that the Fosamax was working well. The truth is probably that I would have been quite imperiled had I continued with it. It’s entirely possible that you’ve made my life not only healthier, but longer than it might have been. (Falling is not an option in one’s eighties!) Thank you, Vivian for creating saveourbones!!!! I couldn’t recommend it more highly! Best regards, Judith Gilbert

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 22, 2018, 9:08 pm

      Judith, how inspiring! Thank you so much for sharing your success story with the community. What an encouragement to others!

  9. Brenda August 22, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hi Viv, Thxs for article-
    The idea of “human parathyroid hormone-related peptide (hPTHrP).”

    WHAT! ! ! alarm bells make me question how the above will (if) change a healthy thyroid, let alone mess w/ one’s Levothyroxine (Synthroid) daily meds.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 22, 2018, 10:47 am

      Hi Brenda,

      Yes, that’s a red flag for sure!

      • MARIE MARKOVICHvivian August 27, 2018, 3:56 am

        Vivian, I so very much wish you had a hard copy in print not digital of the exercise program to increase bones. I follow your advice and thankful I found you,but that was after 5 yrs on fosamax and jaw necrosis I received from taking it.
        I walk do daily core exercises and have stationary bike I use. I’d like to know what else I can do. I’ve also cut sugar intake but do love my ice cream weekly. Any advice?

    • Nancy S. Smith August 22, 2018, 10:44 am

      I bought the Save Our Bones book several years ago and it is a life saver. My primary care phsician referred me to a rheumatologist who wanted me to take Tymlos because my bone density report showed increase in bone loss, so I agreed and in reading the letter, there are five reasons why you should not take the droug…one being if you have kidney stones. The doctor never informed me about that. When I read the paperwork sent with the drug, I declined it and realized one must be very vigilant. I signed up for your emails again and am so grateful for this further information as there is no pharmaceutical panacea for a condition that is not a disease, but a process in aging that affects people in different ways. Thank you for your saving research!

  10. Lina Rahal August 22, 2018, 9:58 am

    bought the Densexercise for computer viewing in June. Was suppose to get the paper version also, wich I would prefer but never got it yet. Is there a problem?

    • Save Institute Customer Support August 22, 2018, 10:46 am

      Lina, all of our products are delivered in PDF format; there are no hard copies. We’ll send you an e-mail with more information.

  11. marlene Nucifora August 22, 2018, 8:39 am

    Hi! Vivian,
    Thank You For This Vital Information.I do not and wouldn’t take anything for osteoporosis..My doctor wanted to give Me Prolia, and I refused..I eat healthy, gym twice a week..weights,kettle bells, and resistant bands, and alot of walking..It’s All Big Pharma..

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA August 22, 2018, 9:15 am

      Keep it up, Marlene. Your bones will thank you!

  12. Mary Ann Lane August 22, 2018, 7:59 am

    Hi.. I have already bought the program and downloaded it but I can’t find it on my phone. Can you tell me how?

    Thankyou
    Mary Ann

    • Save Institute Customer Support August 22, 2018, 9:11 am

      Sure, Mary Ann – we’ll be glad to help you. Please check your inbox for a message from Customer Support.

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