How To Stop Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Silent Bone Killer

Mitochondria are the power stations of the body. Present in just about every type of human cell, including bone, their optimal performance is linked to overall health and longevity. Not surprisingly, your bones are also impacted by mitochondrial health.

Today we’ll dive into cell biology to gain an understanding of the function, and potential dysfunction, of mitochondria. We’ll cite several studies that confirm the effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on aging, health, and specifically on bone density. Then you’ll learn about a compound that works to facilitate and increase mitochondrial synthesis, and how it can improve your bone health and overall health.

What Are Mitochondria?

A mitochondrion is a double membrane-bound organelle (a subunit of a cell), common to almost all eukaryotic organisms, which are organisms composed of cells that contain a nucleus and other organelles bound by membranes.

Mitochondria are essentially the digestive system of the cell, transforming carbohydrates and fatty acids into adenosine triphosphate or ATP. The latter is an energy-carrying molecule that cells need to perform their functions. ATP powers the beating of your heart, your lungs’ exchange of gases, the muscle contractions that allow you to move and support your own weight, even the firing of neurons in your brain. None of that could happen without mitochondria producing ATP. Other mitochondrial functions include:

  • Regulating cellular metabolism
  • Signal transduction to generate cellular response
  • Apoptosis (the process of cell death)
  • Steroid synthesis
  • Calcium signaling
  • Hormone signaling

The only human cells that don’t contain mitochondria are red blood cells. Every other cell in your body uses these tiny power generators, though different types of cells contain different quantities. Muscle cells contain the most mitochondria since muscle contraction requires massive amounts of ATP.

Mitochondrial Biogenesis Explained

The mitochondria within your cells can self-replicate. This is called mitochondrial biogenesis. They possess this unique ability due to their evolutionary history. Mitochondria began as independent cellular life forms that had their own sets of DNA (called mtDNA) and the ability to replicate. Then they developed endosymbiotic relationships with proteobacteria, living inside of these bacteria to gather the nutrients they needed to survive. The bacteria in return received the ATP that mitochondria produce.

While millions of years of evolution have complicated and varied the relationship between cells and mitochondria, they have retained this ability to replicate inside of the cell. Mitochondrial biogenesis was first observed in the 1960s by biologist John Holloszy when he discovered that physical endurance training-induced higher mitochondrial levels.1

When your cells are instructed to use more energy than they can produce, they respond by increasing their capacity to produce energy. This is analogous to the process by which weight bearing exercise exerts a force on your bones, triggering new bone formation. The body is remarkably well equipped to adapt and grow stronger if you provide the right stimulus and the necessary components.

The reverse, however, is also true. A sedentary life doesn’t require as much ATP production, so muscle cells will reduce the number of mitochondria they contain, thereby diminishing your physical strength. Underused mitochondria in other cells suffer the same losses, and just as your body needs certain nutrients to build bone, it needs specific substances to repair and replicate mitochondria.

The Health Impacts Of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

The aging process has been linked to a reduction in number and function of mitochondria. As we age, mitochondria deteriorate and lose their optimal capacity for biosynthesis, ion transport, and oxidative phosphorylation. When the power generators of the cells in any body tissue slow or cease, its functionality is reduced. This applies to the brain, the cardiovascular system, muscles, and bones.

Failing mitochondria also produce excessive and aberrant reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause further harm inside cells, leading to oxidative damage that affects nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. As mitochondria age, fail and produce more ROS, the damage caused by those ROS to cells throughout the body is a driving force of aging. Indeed, studies have shown an inverse relationship between mitochondrial ROS production and lifespan in mammals. The more functional and plentiful your mitochondria are, the longer and healthier your life will be.2

Several health conditions are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, either as a cause or a contributing factor:

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Viral infection
  • Bacterial and fungal infections
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Osteoporosis

Mitochondrial Dysfunction And Osteoporosis

Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in osteoporosis, as shown below:

  • A study found that those with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 2 and cytochrome b genes were more likely to get an osteoporosis diagnosis.3
  • mtDNA deletions cause mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction, which leads to lactate buildup, stimulating bone resorption in osteoclasts, a chain of events that throws the bone remodeling process out of balance.4
  • The loss of an ATP-independent serine protease located in the intermembrane space of the mitochondria has been shown to result in elevated mtDNA deletions, neurodegeneration and osteoporosis.5
  • Other studies have pointed to mitochondrial-derived ROS as the inciting factor in osteoporosis.6
  • High levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) caused by mitochondrial dysfunction in osteoblastic cells result in apoptosis and impair osteoblast formation. Conversely, a buildup of H2O2 induces osteoclast proliferation, worsening the imbalance.7
  • Healthy mitochondria play host to oxidized cholesterol, or oxysterols, some of which work to upregulate osteoblasts and strengthen bone through increased alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin gene expression, and enhanced cell mineralization.8

Clearly, mitochondrial health is imperative to conquering osteoporosis and providing our bodies with the necessary tools to produce strong, flexible bones.

How To Keep Your Mitochondria Healthy

As Holloszy’s research established exercise is crucial for generating more mitochondria.

A study, published in 2006, followed eight elderly volunteers (three women and five men) during a 12-week exercise-training program, in which they completed four to six exercise sessions a week, at least three of which were supervised. The activities included using treadmills, stationary bicycles and outdoor walking, increasing the intensity of the activities over the course of the program.

Before and after the program the subjects had a percutaneous muscle biopsy, a physical fitness test, and a blood sample during fasting conditions to determine markers of insulin resistance. The biopsy was used to examine the mitochondria in the subjects’ skeletal muscle. The results showed that routine exercise created a robust increase in mtDNA and mitochondria, as well as a correlated increase in mitochondrial function.

This research underscores what Savers already know, exercise is an essential prerequisite for increasing bone density and quality. An increase in the quantity and quality of mitochondria is yet another benefit of regular exercise.

Mitochondria Need CoQ10

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant present in all eukaryotic cells, primarily in the mitochondria. It is a key component of the mitochondrial electron transport train that produces ATP.

As an antioxidant, it protects from free radical damage, which is particularly valuable in the mitochondria, where ROS are a bi-product of ATP generation. CoQ10 also increases the absorption of other essential nutrients, recycles Vitamin C and Vitamin E and assists enzymes to properly digest food.

CoQ10 is synthesized in the body, but as we age, its production declines. We have two important tools for increasing our CoQ10 levels: diet and supplements. Combined, they have the potential to combat mitochondrial dysfunction and support the health of our bones, heart, brain, and more.

The following foods are good sources of CoQ10:

  • Beef*
  • Eggs*
  • Chicken
  • Strawberries*
  • Herring
  • Sesame seeds*
  • Pistachio nuts
  • Rainbow Trout
  • Sardines*
  • Mackerel*
  • Broccoli*
  • Cauliflower*
  • Oranges*

*Foundation Food

How To Ensure You Get Enough CoQ10

While the above foods provide a measure of CoQ10, a high-quality CoQ10 supplement can ensure that you’re getting adequate levels for your mitochondria to thrive. This is especially important for anyone who has taken statins or bisphosphonates, as both of these drugs deplete CoQ10 levels. In these cases, a supplement is essential to restore optimal levels and counter the effects of the drugs.

Not every supplement is created equal, and you should be vigilant about making sure that supplements you take have been certified as dose-accurate and safe. TrueCoQ10™ from NatureCity is an exceptional supplement that provides the most bioavailable form of CoQ10: ubiquinol. And TrueCoQ10™ contains the Kaneka QH™ brand of ubiquinol, which is the “active” form of CoQ10 and accounts for about 90% of the CoQ10 used by the body.

Until recently, the only form of CoQ10 that was available as a supplement was ubiquinone, the oxidized state of the compound. But due to improvements in production technology TrueCoQ10™ is made with CoQH-CF™ technology which protects the ubiquinol from crystalizing (aiding absorption) and oxidizing (maintaining potency). It has been shown to be eight times more effective than ubiquinone at raising blood levels of CoQ10.9

Our friends at NatureCity have offered a special 20% off coupon exclusively for Savers who want to improve their mitochondrial health and bolster their bones with this powerful antioxidant.

Exclusive 20% OFF TrueCoQ10™ Coupon Code for Savers!

Use coupon code: SAVEOURBONES at checkout to get 20% off your order!

Try TrueCoQ10™, the “active” CoQ10 supplement, now →

TrueCoQ10™ is an excellent tool for fighting the effects of aging and building stronger more resilient bones.

Till next time,

References:

1John O. Holloszy. “Biochemical Adaptations in Muscle Effects Of Exercise On Mitochondrial Oxygen Uptake And Respiratory Enzyme Activity In Skeletal Muscle.” The Journal of Biological Chemistry. May 10, 1967. 242, 2278-2282. Web: http://www.jbc.org/content/242/9/2278.abstract
2Rebecca K.Lanea, Tyler Hilsabeckab, Shane L.Reaac. “The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in age-related diseases.” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Bioenergetics. Volume 1847, Issue 11, November 2015, Pages 1387-1400. Web: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005272815001085
3Y. Guo, T.L. Yang, Y.Z. Liu, H. Shen, S.F. Lei, N. Yu, J. Chen, T. Xu, Y. Cheng, Q. Tian, P. Yu, H.W. Deng. “Mitochondria-wide association study of common variants in osteoporosis.” Ann. Hum. Genet., 75 (2011), pp. 569-574
4A. Trifunovic, A. Wredenberg, M. Falkenberg, J.N. Spelbrink, et al. “Premature ageing in mice expressing defective mitochondrial DNA polymerase.” Nature, 429 (2004), p. 417. Web: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15164064
5S. Kang, T. Fernandes-Alnemri, E.S. Alnemri. “A novel role for the mitochondrial HTRA2/OMI protease in aging.” Autophagy, 9 (2013), pp. 420-421
6Y.H. Yang, B. Li, X.F. Zheng, J.W. Chen, K. Chen, S.D. Jiang, L.S. Jiang. “Oxidative damage to osteoblasts can be alleviated by early autophagy through the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway — implications for the treatment of osteoporosis” Free Radic. Biol. Med., 77 (2014), pp. 10-2. Web: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891584914004195
7S.C. Manolagas. “From estrogen-centric to aging and oxidative stress: a revised perspective of the pathogenesis of osteoporosis.” Endocr. Rev., 31 (2010), pp. 266-300
8H.T. Kha, B. Basseri, D. Shouhed, J. Richardson, S. Tetradis, T.J. Hahn, F. Parhami. “Oxysterols regulate diferentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: pro-bone and anti-fat.” J. Bone Miner. Res., 19 (2004), pp. 830-840.
9Hosoe K, Kitano M, Kishida H, Kubo H, Fujii K, Kitahara M. “Study on safety and bioavailability of ubiquinol (Kaneka QH) after single and 4-week multiple oral administration to healthy volunteers.” Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2007 Feb;47(1):19-28. Web: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16919858

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14 comments. Leave Yours Now →
  1. Jette B. Lauritsen December 7, 2017, 5:27 pm

    Thank you so much for this very interesting article.
    It sparked a big fire of hope for me.

    I have been using redox signalling molecules as a supplement for a bit more than a year now. I had a dexa-scan yesterday, and will have the results next week.

    With the information you give here, I feel so sure, that my bones has changed for the better.
    As the redox is native to the body, it can “go to work” directly.

    Thank you for bringing hope 🙂

  2. Josephine November 24, 2017, 9:36 pm

    I have heard that if you are older than 30 years old, the body cannot absorb COQ10, that we should take Ubiquinol instead. COQ10 is converted to Ubinquinol, which is what we need. But older adults cannot do this. I have the experience recently with it. I had terrible muscle spasms. When I realized I was lacking Ubiquinol, I took it, and all the pains and spasms disappeard within a few hours!

  3. Mary November 22, 2017, 10:20 am

    Two things about this product promotion bother me:
    1. Nowhere on the promotional material does it say how many servings are in a bottle.
    2. By going to the naturecity.com website, I see that the same bottle (30 servings if you magnify the picture of the label) costs $22.97 each, whereas in your website it is 34.97 Can you explain the difference? It appears to be the same supplement.

    • Margaret December 9, 2017, 9:28 am

      Also need to know how many tabs/capsules in a 100mg bottle. How many doses a day to be effective?

  4. John November 21, 2017, 12:19 pm

    How does TruCoQ10 compare to the Qunol Liquid? I know that Consumers Lab has approved this product, which my wife and I take it daily.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 21, 2017, 1:43 pm

      Hi John,

      There are quite a few CoQ10 supplements out there, so it’s not practical for us to compare each one to TruCoQ10; but I can suggest you check your current liquid supplement and see if it meets the criteria for a quality CoQ10 supplement. You’ll find the criteria in the article above – here it is copied and pasted if you need it:

      “Not every supplement is created equal, and you should be vigilant about making sure that supplements you take have been certified as dose-accurate and safe. TrueCoQ10™ from NatureCity is an exceptional supplement that provides the most bioavailable form of CoQ10: ubiquinol. And TrueCoQ10™ contains the Kaneka QH™ brand of ubiquinol, which is the ‘active’ form of CoQ10 and accounts for about 90% of the CoQ10 used by the body.

      Until recently, the only form of CoQ10 that was available as a supplement was ubiquinone, the oxidized state of the compound. But due to improvements in production technology TrueCoQ10™ is made with CoQH-CF™ technology which protects the ubiquinol from crystalizing (aiding absorption) and oxidizing (maintaining potency). It has been shown to be eight times more effective than ubiquinone at raising blood levels of CoQ10.9”

  5. shula November 21, 2017, 12:04 pm

    Thank you for this information about mitochondria, and especially about the foods which contain coq10.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 21, 2017, 1:41 pm

      You are very welcome, Shula!

  6. Anne November 21, 2017, 11:59 am

    Vivien,

    Thanks for all your good advice, re your latest communication, one question:

    Is there any way to get the CoQ10 from food, as the food supplement would not be compatible with my regular prescription meds? I have been warned not to take any supplements unless medically advised for this reason.

    If there are any foods that contain CoQ10, what are they?

    Thanks and best wishes.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 21, 2017, 12:13 pm

      You are welcome, Anne! There is a list of food sources of CoQ10 in the article – you may have missed it. 🙂 Here it is:

      The following foods are good sources of CoQ10:

      Beef*
      Eggs*
      Chicken
      Strawberries*
      Herring
      Sesame seeds*
      Pistachio nuts
      Rainbow Trout
      Sardines*
      Mackerel*
      Broccoli*
      Cauliflower*
      Oranges*

      *Foundation Food

  7. Faye Murphy November 21, 2017, 11:35 am

    I suppose you are aware that Fluoroquinolones drugs cause damage to the Mitochondria DNA cells. There are thousands of us who have had this damage who are now crippled. These drugs have taken all the cartilage out of all my joints, caused tendon damage, muscle damage, central nervous damage, balance problems and many other problems as well. I am 83 and am still able to get around somewhat with the aid of a walker and cane, but there are many young people who have experienced these damages who are in worse shape than me. I do exercise as best I can and take a lot of supplements, but not CoQ10. Would it help when the damages are caused by these fluoride drugs? Also, I would love to see you address this horrible problem in your e-mail one of these days. Thanks.

  8. Donna November 21, 2017, 10:07 am

    there is no option to see the full bottle label. Can you provide, please? e.g full ingredients, medicinal and non; # mg per capsule; how many capsules in the bottle; how many do you take a day; is one bottle enough for one month? thanks.

    • Vivian Goldschmidt, MA November 21, 2017, 11:56 am

      Hi Donna,

      TrueCoQ10 has a stabilized form of ubiquinol called Kaneka QH™. This prevents oxidation of the CoQ10 and is more effective at raising blood levels. Here is the information from the label:

      30 Softgels
      Serving Size: 1 Softgel
      Servings per Container: 30
      Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
      Calories: 1
      Calories from Fat: 0 g
      Total Fat: 0 g 0%*
      Cholesterol: 0 g 0%*
      CoQH-CF™ ubiquinol (Kaneka QH Ubiquinol™ reduced form of CoQ10): 50mg

      Other ingredients: D-limonene oil, gelatin, glycerin, purified water, caprylic acid, capric acid, caramel liquid, alpha lipoic acid

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